PHOTOS FROM THE GROUND: Britain’s Red Arrows

Oct 19, 2016 11.00AM |
 

by Najeer Yusof

AFTER two postponements by Britain’s Royal Air Force’s (RAF) aerobatic team, the Red Arrows finally did a flypast in Singapore yesterday (Oct 18).

They flew into Singapore’s airspace from Subang, Malaysia and landed at Paya Lebar Air Base. Their stop in Singapore is part of the team’s two-month tour to the Middle East and Asia.

If you missed out on their flypast, here are some photos:

FLYPAST: The Red Arrows fly past the Merlion statue at Marina Bay. They emitted white smoke during their flypast today. The diesel is injected into the hot exhaust at vapourised at 400 degrees celsius, to create the smoke. Dyes are mixed with the diesel for coloured smoke. They are famous for their red, white and blue smoke trails. The smoke is used both for their aerial displays and for safety purposes such as allowing the pilot to gauge the wind speed and direction. (Image sourced from British High Commission)
FLYPAST: The British RAF’s aerobatic team, the Red Arrows, flew past the Merlion statue at Marina Bay, in a ‘V’ shaped Battle formation. The pilots decided to fly this formation instead of their famous Diamond 9 formation as the formation is used for grand occasions, including the Queen’s birthday. Having completed its 52nd display season, the RAF is on a tour to Asia-Pacific and the Middle East. Their flypast and stopover in Singapore was aimed at promoting the long-standing relations between Britain and Singapore. (Photo by British High Commission)

 

REFUEL AND RECHARGE: A Circus crew member assists in refueling the jet from a aircraft refueller. While pilots headed to the lounge to cool down, the Circus crew ensured the jets were serviced and refueled. Two aircraft refueller drove to the jets to refuel them.
REFUEL AND RECHARGE: A Circus crew member (in blue) assists in refuelling the jet from an aircraft refueller. While pilots headed to the lounge to cool down, the Circus crew ensured that the jets were serviced and refuelled. Two aircraft refuellers drove to the jets to refuel them.

 

FRESH LOOK: The tailfins of the Red Arrow jets. The flowing Union flag tailfin became the new design for the Red Arrows since the 2015 season. There were 10 jets that completed the flypast today.
UNION JACK: The tailfins of the Red Arrow jets. The flowing Union flag tailfin became the new design for the Red Arrows since the 2015 season. There were 10 jets that completed the flypast yesterday (Oct 18).

 

RED ARROWS: A Red Arrow jet lands on the Paya Lebar Air Base and emits a white coloured smoke. The Jets are 11.9 metres in length, and four metres in height. They can reach a maximum speed of Mach 1.2. The Red Arrows are famous for their red, white and blue smoke trails. The smoke is used both for their aerial displays and for safety purposes such as allowing the pilot to gauge the wind speed and direction.
RED ARROWS: A Red Arrow jet, BAE Systems Hawk T. Mark 1, lands at the Paya Lebar Air Base and emits a white coloured smoke. The jets are 11.9 metres in length, and four metres in height. They can reach a maximum speed of mach 1.2 (1482 km/h). The Red Arrows are famous for their red, white and blue smoke trails. Smoke is used for both their aerial displays and for safety purposes such as allowing the pilot to gauge wind speed and direction. Diesel is injected into the hot exhaust and vaporised at 400 degrees Celsius to create smoke. For coloured smoke, dyes are mixed with the diesel.

 

GUIDING HANDS: A ground marshal guides one of the Red Arrow pilots into the parking bay, with handsigns. Each of the jet was assigned one ground marshall to assist the pilots in parking the jets.
GUIDING HANDS: A ground marshal guides one of the Red Arrow pilots into the parking bay, using hand signals. A ground marshal was assigned to each jet to assist the pilots in parking the jets.

 

RED AND BLUE: The Pilot and Circus crew member of Red 7. The Pilots are dressed in a red jumpsuit while the Circus crew members wear blue jumpsuits. The Circus crew members fly in the rear seats of the jets and do so only on transit flights and not during display shows.
RED AND BLUE: The pilot and Circus crew member of Red 7. The pilots were dressed in a red jumpsuit while the Circus crew members wore blue jumpsuits. The Circus crew members fly in the rear seats of the jets and do so only on transit flights and not during display shows.

 

GROUPTALK: After the Red Arrows landed in Paya Lebar Air Base, they gathered at the wing of one if the jets, to record the flight logs and for a quick briefing by their Squadron Leader.
BRIEFING: After the Red Arrows landed in Paya Lebar Air Base, the pilots gathered around the wing of one of the jets, to update their flight logs and for a quick briefing by their Squadron Leader.

 

WIPED CLEAN: Circus 3, Corporal David Hawes, 31, a Mechanical Engineer, wipes the windshield of the aircraft. After the Red Arrows taxied to a stop at Paya Lebar Air Base, the Circus crew, started doing aircraft maintenance. The Circus crew is the team of support crew, and they comprise of Mechanical Engineers, Avionic and Weapons Technicians and a Photographer. They are selected on an annual basis and are tasked with servicing the jets.
CLEAN VIEW: Circus 3, Corporal David Hawes, 31, a Mechanical Engineer, wipes the windshield of the aircraft. After the Red Arrows taxied to a stop at Paya Lebar Air Base, the Circus crew, started servicing the jets. The Circus crew is the support crew, and they comprise of Mechanical Engineers, Avionic and Weapons Technicians and a Photographer. They are selected on an annual basis to join the squadron and are tasked with servicing the jets.

 

Featured image and other images by Najeer Yusof and the British High Commission.

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