3 ways Singapore’s employment scene is more progressive than you think

Mar 15, 2017 08.00PM |
 

by Ryan Ong

EMPLOYMENT regulations have come a long way in Singapore. Earlier in our history, this was a country with a strict “no-strike” policy and a lot of power vested in employers; all part of an early-days survival method. But with the step into first world status, Singapore’s employment scene has become more progressive by the year:

 

1. TAFEP and the Fair Consideration Framework

In 2006, the Tripartite Alliance for Fair Employment Practices (TAFEP) was set up to promote responsible employment practices. The “tripartite” element refers to co-operation between employers, unions, and the Singapore government to further this goal.

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One result of having TAFEP is the Fair Consideration Framework (FCF). The FCF ensures that hirers stick to merit-based hiring, using competence as the deciding factor instead of elements such as age, gender, and nationality.

One example of this is the Jobs Bank. Before hiring an Employment Pass (EP) holder, a company must* advertise the job on Jobs Bank for at least 14 days, making it available to Singaporeans. Only after this period can the company apply for an EP.

This ensures that companies cannot show an unfair preference for hiring foreigners. They must show they tried to hire a Singaporean first.

(*Some exceptions exist, such as if the company has fewer than 25 employees, or only needs to fill a temporary position for no more than one month. You can see the list of exceptions here.)

In addition, anyone can report to the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) if they see a discriminatory job advertisement. An example would be an ad that says “only foreigners”, or imposes restrictions irrelevant to the job (e.g. requiring a worker to have certain religious beliefs, for an accounting position).

Furthermore, TAFEP has an online system for complaints about workplace discrimination. Employees who feel they are treated poorly, or penalised for non-work related issues (e.g. age, gender, religion, political views, sexuality) can raise a complaint (their confidentiality is protected).

 

2. The Human Capital Partnership Programme, to encourage good workplace practices

The Human Capital Partnership (HCP) programme is an initiative open to companies with a good track record in employment and workplace practices. Companies that are part of the HCP (called Human Capital Partners) commit to investing in the development of Singaporean employees across all levels.

In return, Human Capital Partners enjoy priority access when having work passes processed, and have a dedicated hotline for transactions with MOM. Human Capital Partners will have privileged access to government support and resources, and have the right to display the “Human Capital Partner” mark, which helps to attract needed employees.

Human Capital Partners, for example, have account managers assigned to them from HCP to cultivate good workplace practices. This ensures that the concept of fair employment cannot just be a temporary front.

This is in stark contrast with old-school methods; traditional systems of employee protection just use penalties and fines as threats, which places the burden of fair employment on government regulators.

HCP instead provides positive incentives for companies, to encourage the hirers themselves to maintain good practices.

 

3. Skills Transfer Initiatives

One of the HCP’s goals is to turn foreign workers into a complement to our workforce, instead of competition. The formula is:

1/3 + 2/3 > 1.

That refers to how one-third of our workforce is composed of foreigners, and two-thirds are Singaporeans. By having the two complement each other, we develop synergy and results that are greater than the sum of our parts.

One example of this is skill transfer programmes that HCP encourages. 3M, the manufacturer of the famous Post-It notes, is engaged with this initiative. The manufacturer has several programmes in which foreign workers can teach or transfer skills to local employees (and vice versa). This ensures that each worker is more versatile, and can be moved into new roles quickly. The result is a more nimble and adaptable company.

Endorsing skills transfers is a progressive take; rather than set up an adversarial relationship between locals and foreigners (the old “they’ll eat our lunch” argument), Singaporean employers are instead encouraged to merge the two, to make our companies more competitive.

A more competitive company means better wages, more room for career advancement, and greater job security.

 

Building the workforce for the new era
The Singaporean worker today is, by and large, no longer an easily replaced resource. As we see more talented programmers, engineers, managers, and salespeople, it is clear the dynamics of the workplace will change.

No longer are employees wholly dependent on the whims of their employer; rather, the reverse is often true. Many companies are now dependent on the skills and talents of their workers, who have no shortage of options when it comes to finding work elsewhere.

In light of this, any adversarial relationship between employer and employee will be a tremendous disruption to local business (and by extension, the wider economy). It’s time we discard outmoded notions of “worker versus employer”, lest all of us fall behind.

The simplest way to do that is not with over-regulation and fines, but to ensure that companies themselves see the value of treating employees right.

 

This article is part of a series on employment in partnership with the Ministry of Manpower.

 

Featured image by Sean Chong.

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