May 27, 2017

18
PSI
CONNECT WITH US
 
 
Authors Posts by TMG VISUALS

TMG VISUALS

TMG VISUALS
65 POSTS 0 COMMENTS

A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSPL0F

REUTERS

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks at a mask of himself as he speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2SEPF
TWO FACE: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump looks at a mask of himself as he speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, U.S. November 7, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

 

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (L) greets vice presidential nominee Mike Pence after Pence spoke during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSIYH1
POLITICAL COUPLE: Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump (left) greets vice presidential candidate Mike Pence after Pence spoke during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Mike Segar

 

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds babies at a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S., July 29, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSKBQJ
NANNY-IN-CHIEF: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds babies at a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S., July 29, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

 

Donald Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is seen after it was vandalized in Los Angeles, California U.S., October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2QL52
RAISING STAR?: Donald Trump’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as seen after it was vandalised in Los Angeles, California U.S., October 26, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

 

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump hugs a U.S. flag as he comes onstage to rally with supporters in Tampa, Florida, U.S. October 24, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTX2QA5N
I LOVE AMERICA: Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump hugs a U.S. flag as he comes onstage to rally with supporters in Tampa, Florida, U.S. October 24, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

 

A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSPL0F
MOUTHING OFF: A journalist records a video from a screen as Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlos Barria

 

A young boy high-fives Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump as his wife Melania watches as the candidate waits at the Seven Flags Event Center in Clive, Iowa February 1, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Bourg (UNITED STATES - TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX250R5
HI-FIVE: A young boy high-fives Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump as his wife Melania watches as the candidate waits at the Seven Flags Event Center in Clive, Iowa February 1, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Jim Bourg

 

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri - RTX2SKR2
COPYCAT: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

 

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2T2GN
PASSING THE BATON: U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

 

Audience member Robin Roy (C) reacts as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets her at a campaign rally in Lowell, Massachusetts January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX211IR
SHOCK WIN: Audience member Robin Roy (Centre) reacts as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets her at a campaign rally in Lowell, Massachusetts January 4, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Brian Snyder

 

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

U.S. President elect Donald Trump speaks at election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

by REUTERS

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

by -
0 0

REUTERS

A voter casts his ballot in the U.S. presidential election inside a Chicago Fire department building in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young - RTX2SL1K
VOTING RED?: A voter casts his ballot in the United States (US) presidential election inside a Chicago Fire department building in Chicago, Illinois. Photo by: REUTERS/Jim Young

 

People cast their ballots at a neighborhood grocery store in the 2016 presidential election in National City, California, U.S November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTX2SL7M
APPLE OR ORANGES: People cast their ballots at a neighbourhood grocery store in the 2016 presidential election in National City, California. Photo by: REUTERS/Mike Blake

 

A voter holds his ballot in the U.S. presidential election at Su Nueva Lavanderia in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young - RTX2SIGF
ELECTION DIRTY LAUNDRY: A voter holds his ballot in the US presidential election at Su Nueva Lavanderia in Chicago, Illinois. Photo by: REUTERS/Jim Young

 

Voters cast their ballots at a polling station set up in a garage during the U.S. presidential election, near Fernald, Iowa, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Scott Morgan - RTX2SLFC
FIXING AMERICA: Voters cast their ballots at a polling station set up in a garage during the US presidential election, near Fernald, Iowa. Photo by: REUTERS/Scott Morgan

 

A voter casts his ballot inside the garage of Chobert Decorators during the U.S. presidential election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller - RTX2SL56
VOTING TOOLS: A voter casts his ballot inside the garage of Chobert Decorators during the US presidential election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US. Photo by: REUTERS/Charles Mostoller

 

A polling place is set up inside Anthony's Tavern during the U.S. presidential election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller - RTX2SL5N
HAVE A DRINK AND VOTE: A polling place is set up inside Anthony’s Tavern during the US presidential election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US. Photo by: REUTERS/Charles Mostoller

 

A voter fills out his ballot in a living room polling place during the U.S. presidential election in Dover, Oklahoma, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Nick Oxford - RTX2SIW0
VOTING AT HOME: A voter fills out his ballot in a living room polling place during the US presidential election in Dover, Oklahoma, US. Photo by: REUTERS/Nick Oxford

 

Voters cast their ballot in the U.S. presidential election at Marie's Golden Cue in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young - RTX2SMGR
VOTING ON CUE: Voters cast their ballot in the US presidential election at Marie’s Golden Cue in Chicago, Illinois, US. Photo by: REUTERS/Jim Young

 

 

Images and text by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

Children watch their mother vote during the U.S. general election in Greenville, North Carolina, U.S. on November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake - RTX2SM7K

REUTERS

 

 

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri - RTX2SKR2

REUTERS

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

A Red Panda searches for food inside a carved Halloween pumpkin in its enclosure as part of the Enchantment event at Chester Zoo in Chester, Britain October 24, 2016. REUTERS/Phil Noble - RTX2Q7AX

REUTERS

 

Featured image and video by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

A portrait of Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej stands as people memorialize his death at the Wat Thai of Los Angeles temple in Los Angeles, California, U.S., October 13, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
REUTERS

EIGHTY-EIGHT years of age when he died, King Bhumibol Adulyadej was widely revered in Thailand and seen as a unifying force in an often turbulent country.

His reign began in 1946 and lasted seven decades. During that time, he intervened when protests, coups and other political upheavals threatened to plunge Thailand into crisis.

His final year was marked by various health ailments. He was most recently battling a respiratory infection and had been treated for kidney failure this month.

 

 

Featured image and video by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

A still image captured from a video from WABC television shows a conscious man believed to be New York bombing suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami being loaded into an ambulance after a shoot-out with police in Linden, New Jersey, U.S., September 19, 2016. Courtesy WABC-TV via REUTERS

REUTERS

.

POLICE on Monday arrested an Afghanistan-born American who they suspect of detonating a bomb in the heart of New York City and planting other devices, capturing the 28-year-old in a dramatic gun battle that wounded him and two officers.

Officials did not offer any information on the possible motives of Ahmad Khan Rahami, but they said they were not looking for other suspects. New York’s mayor said the bombing that injured 29 people in the bustling Chelsea district was “an act of terror.”

Police in Linden, New Jersey, swooped in on Rahami just hours after authorities publicly identified him as the prime suspect in the Saturday night blast and sent out an alert to millions of mobile phone users.

Authorities suspect Rahami, who lived in the neighbouring town of Elizabeth, was also behind a bomb that exploded on the New Jersey shore on Saturday, a device found near the New York blast, and up to six more devices found near the Elizabeth train station on Sunday night. The bombings and subsequent manhunt prompted even greater security in America’s biggest city, already on high alert for the gathering of world leaders at the United Nations in New York for the annual General Assembly this week. An additional 1,000 officers were deployed.

Police in Linden were responding to a complaint by a bar owner of a man sleeping in the closed establishment’s entranceway.

“The officer realised that this might be the person that the FBI was looking for. The officer then said, ‘show me your hands,’ and the person went to the side of his body and pulled out a handgun and fired a round at the officer, striking him in the abdomen. Fortunately, the officer had his bulletproof vest on,” Linden Police Captain James Sarnicki told reporters.

Rahami indiscriminately opened fired on police, officials said, injuring another officer with broken glass that struck his forehead.

Police fired back, wounding Rahami in the arm and leg. Eyewitness video showed Rahami handcuffed in a gurney, his wounds bandaged, before he was taken to hospital for surgery. His condition was not considered life threatening, police said.

Focusing just on the shootout, the Union County Prosecutor’s Office charged Rahami with five counts of attempted murder in the first degree and two second-degree weapons charges, spokesman Mark Spivey said.

More charges were likely in federal court but Preet Bharara, the US attorney for the southern district of New York, said authorities would take their time.

‘DEMON RAGE’

Rahami had not previously been identified as dangerous but his family was known to police as a result of late-night noise and crowd complaints at a family halal chicken restaurant in Elizabeth.

“This is a criminal, sick act and it’s an idea that is coming from abroad and spilling over into the youth and this demon rage,” said Salaam Ismial, a social worker at Masjid Al-Hadi, a mosque in Elizabeth, and who said he knew Rahami.

“A rightful Muslim would denounce this violence. The Koran is very clear on this.”

Investigators said they had not yet determined a motive for the bombings and there was no indication that an extremist cell was operating in the area, William Sweeney of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s New York division told a news conference.

Five people who had been taken into custody in Brooklyn late on Sunday for questioning after being observed by law enforcement officers at a location associated with Rahami were released without charges, Sweeney said.

US President Barack Obama, who spoke by phone with some of the officers involved in the arrest, praised police for the quick apprehension and said he saw no connection between the explosions and a separate weekend incident where a man stabbed nine people at a mall in central Minnesota before being shot dead.

The Minnesota attacker was described a “soldier of the Islamic State”, the militant group’s news agency said.

Authorities believe Rahami was responsible for the bomb that ripped through Manhattan’s Chelsea neighbourhood on Saturday night, an unexploded pressure cooker bomb found four blocks away, plus a bomb that exploded 130km away earlier on Saturday at a Marine charity race on the New Jersey shore.

US authorities also believe the devices found in Elizabeth are linked to the Chelsea bombing, Homeland Security Officials told Reuters.

Two men walking past the Elizabeth train station on Sunday evening noticed a backpack left in a trash bin and took it, thinking it might contain valuables, Elizabeth Mayor Chris Bollwage told reporters. They called police when they noticed wires and a pipe inside.

As many as five potential explosive devices tumbled out when it was emptied, Bollwage said. After cordoning off the area, a bomb squad used a robot to cut a wire to try to disable the device and set off an explosion, he said.

.

Featured image and text by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

 

Airline passengers walk past a banner about the Zika virus shortly after landing from Singapore at Soekarno-Hatta airport in Jakarta, Indonesia August 30, 2016. The banner reads "Careful mosquitos spread Zika." Picture taken August 30, 2016. REUTERS/Beawiharta - RTX2O6SQ

by TMG Visuals

THE Indonesian Health Ministry said yesterday (Sept 15) that it has installed larvae traps around its airport terminals as one of the measures to prevent the spreading of Zika virus amid an outbreak in Singapore.

At the Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta, one of the busiest airports in Southeast Asia, authorities prepared about 1,000 larvae traps, placing them in the garden, arrival and departure hall, offices, toilets and all public areas across three terminals.

The trap provides an artificial ground for mosquitoes to lay eggs and the chemical in the container will kill the larvae in it. Health officials hope this will effectively reduce the population of mosquitoes.

This is the latest measure carried out by the Indonesia air transport hub following a Zika outbreak in Singapore. It has also enforced thermal scanning on all passengers arriving from here since last month.

Singapore reported its first locally-infected Zika patient on August 27 and since then, the number of reported infections has soared to more than 300. Thailand has recorded about 200 cases of Zika since January, increasing fears that Indonesia, a country of 250 million population, could be exposed to the virus.

“There are about 6,000 passengers arriving from Singapore almost everyday. We monitor and check the body temperature of arrival passengers with thermal scanners, no one so far has been detected (as a possible virus carrier),” said Mr Susanto, a health official who goes by only one name.

“Apparently, not all of them show overheating symptoms like dengue, some of them could be suffering from fever that is under 38 degrees. So the most important thing to do is not let mosquitoes spread around the airport area, therefore we installed these larvae traps in the whole airport area.”

The installation is part of the Indonesian government’s disease prevention programme called “3M”.

Said Mr Oscar Primadi, head of the communication department of Indonesia’s Health Ministry: “The airport, as the entrance (to the nation), is important when it comes to protecting us from Zika. This method can help. We will continue the effort because it is part of the government’s ‘3M’ prevention measure.”

“This is one of the methods that is effective in eradicating the population of mosquitoes. So, I would like to reiterate that, we will advocate this method to the public as it has been proven to be an efficient technology. We will do anything we can to curb the growing of the mosquitoes,” he added.

The Zika virus, which has spread through the Americas and the Caribbean since late last year, is generally a mild disease but is a particular risk to pregnant women. It has been linked to microcephaly – a severe birth defect in which babies are born with abnormally small heads and underdeveloped brains.

 

Featured image by REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

Chiara Micheletti helps her mother Marisa Vesco take a shower in Cossato, Italy, June 7, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life she was not able to bathe herself. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMRJ

GAIA SQUARCI/ REUTERS

Marisa Vesco eats ice cream in her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 30, 2015. Marisa suffered from liver cancer and a loss of appetite during the last months of her life; eating ice cream was one of her few pleasures. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMRF
LIFE PLEASURES: Marisa Vesco eats ice cream in her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 30, 2015. Marisa suffered from liver cancer and a loss of appetite during the last months of her life; eating ice cream was one of her few pleasures. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

MY GRANDMOTHER’S life and mine overlapped for 27 years. I always called her “Nonna.”

Our age difference and profoundly contrasting values and way of thinking did not prevent us from developing a strong bond and a relationship punctuated by mischievous games and moments of tenderness and humour. We were amused by our differences.

“You know, I was still young when you were born,” she told me a few weeks before she died. “It’s a little like we grew up together.”

At a lunch table a few months earlier in Milan, I learned from my mother, her daughter, that Nonna, 85, suffered from incurable liver cancer. Years before, she had already survived two bouts of breast cancer.

 

Old family photographs are seen on Marisa VescoÕs bed as she works on creating a family album with her granddaughter, the photographer Gaia Squarci in Cossato, Italy, July 1, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMSH
PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY: Old family photographs are seen on Marisa Vesco’s bed as she works on creating a family album with her granddaughter, the photographer. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

Nonna would tell me time and time again that the news of my birth had given her the strength to fight.

When I learned that she was sick again, I had just landed in Italy, where I would be for only three days before flying back to New York.

Even more heartbreaking than the fear of saying goodbye to her was the fact that my grandmother did not know how sick she was. My mother and aunt believed she could not bear the thought of a third bout with cancer, this time, affecting her liver. Nonna was told by family members that her liver was ill.

 

Chiara Micheletti helps to bathe her mother Marisa Vesco in Milan, Italy May 21, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life needed assistance. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMS3
MOTHER AND DAUGHTER: Chiara Micheletti helps to bathe her mother Marisa Vesco in Milan, Italy May 21, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life needed assistance. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

No one ever mentioned the word “cancer.”

Because of this, one question haunted us until the day she died: Did we have the right to know the truth about her condition when she did not?

Nonna spent most of her last months at home, surrounded by family. She reconciled with the idea of death and said she could slowly feel it coming.

Doctors felt that surgery and chemotherapy would be pointless.

 

Marisa VescoÕs perfume bottles, almost all of which were empty, sit on the edge of the bath at her home in Cossato, Italy, February 5, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMSD
A WHIFF OF THE PAST: Marisa Vesco’s perfume bottles, almost all of which were empty, sit on the edge of the bath at her home in Cossato, Italy, February 5, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

In the midst of all this, I realised my mother was losing her mother.

After moving back to Italy for a few months, I witnessed the range of my mother’s emotions and the energy she devoted to the time they had left together.

Nonna’s world shrank to a few walls and fewer streets. In this narrow existence, every detail and daily act took on deeper meaning.

 

The pills taken by Marisa Vesco to alleviate the symptoms of liver cancer are photographed on her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 23, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMSF
DAILY SUSTENANCE: The pills taken by Marisa Vesco to alleviate the symptoms of liver cancer. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

One of the things my mother treasured most was giving her mother a bath. She did not hesitate to touch her old body, and she did not want others to do it on her behalf.

I joined my mother and grandmother in the bathroom to quietly observe them with my camera.

 

Marisa Vesco reaches for a magazine in a bedroom of her apartment in Cossato, Italy, June 7, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMR1
REQUIRED READING: Marisa Vesco reaches for a magazine in a bedroom of her apartment. She joked about the photos taken by the photographer appearing on the magazine covers. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

As I experienced those precious moments, I imagined myself at an older age and thought about how time changes one’s perspective on being a woman.

As my grandmother faced my lens, completely naked, her body bearing the signs of past and present illnesses, she did not show the slightest bit of shame – only trust and pride.

 

Marisa Vesco embraces her nephew Luca Squarci during a visit to Cossato, Italy, June 22, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMSQ
HUGS: Marisa Vesco embraces her nephew Luca Squarci during a visit to Cossato, Italy. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

If you spoke with people in Nonna’s town they would say she never left the house without being enveloped in a cloud of perfume, her white hair perfectly coiffed and her face tinged with makeup.

I was surprised by the way she confronted being ill without losing her femininity. She was able to poke fun at herself. More than once she asked me, “Am I going to end up on Vogue or Marie Claire?”

 

Chiara Micheletti embraces her mother Marisa Vesco in her room at a hospice where she stayed for a month and a half before her death in Biella, Italy, August 21, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMR5
BY HER SIDE: Chiara Micheletti embraces her mother Marisa Vesco in her room at a hospice where she stayed for a month and a half before her death in Biella, Italy, August 21, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

On October 11, 2015, the day Nonna died in Biella, Italy, I was across the world in Brooklyn, New York. I had spent five months with her, celebrating her life instead of mourning her death.

I remember taking a walk through the Greenpoint neighbourhood of Brooklyn and staring for a while at kids competing in a race. I was unable to come to terms with the fact she was no longer a part of the world around me.

I struggled with the concept of death and the abstract emotion we call grief. I found peace only when I returned to Italy to spread Nonna’s ashes.

 

Marisa VescoÕs ashes are spread by her nephew Luca Squarci at her favourite location where she grew up near Cossato, Italy, December 16, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMRC
FAREWELL: Marisa Vesco’s ashes are spread by her nephew Luca Squarci at her favourite location where she grew up near Cossato, Italy, December 16, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

My family and I walked to Nonna’s favourite place in the mountains not far from Cossato in northwestern Italy, the town in which she had grown up.

Her ashes felt heavy in my hands. I threw them far up into the air, and they fell all over the grass, and all over me. My mother, brother and aunt did the same, again and again.

In the end, we were covered in Nonna’s ashes and so was the field around us.

Months later, my mother sent me a photograph of that field. It was completely covered in flowers.

 

Featured image by Gaia Squarci/ REUTERS.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.