April 29, 2017

31
PSI
CONNECT WITH US
 
 
Authors Posts by Sean Chong

Sean Chong

Sean Chong
24 POSTS 0 COMMENTS

THE first Football Association Singapore (FAS) elections is turning out to be quite the drama. The two teams vying for control of the association are Mr Bill Ng’s Game Changers and Mr Lim Kia Tong’s Team LKT. Things got spicy when Mr Ng crowed about a $500,000 donation to the Asean Football Federation via the FAS. This led to questions about propriety, $36.8 million in jackpot revenue made by minnows Tiong Bahru FC (which eclipsed the FAS annual budget), links made between him and former FAS political-appointee President Zainudin Nordin, and police raids on his clubs and the FAS offices. Former FAS council members on Team LKT said they were unaware of the $500,000 donation to Asean Football Federation’s (AFF). The FAS election is still going to happen tomorrow, Apr 29. Anyway, good luck, Singapore football! Let’s keep the game clean.

You, our readers, are the reason we exist. Your contributions allow us to bring fair and balanced news to everyone, regardless of the ability to donate. Support us by being our patron.

Read other pieces here:

  1. Former FAS council members unaware of donation, no oversight on gaming at clubhouses
  2. FAS saga: Fruit machines and the root of all evil
  3. Football saga: Six points of contention
  4. Hat-trick of raids at football clubs, investigations at FAS
  5. Speak up Mr Zainudin!

 

Featured image by Sean Chong.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

 

 

GOVERNMENT officers will not be grouped merely by their educational qualifications from now on. This means that so long as poly diploma holders are competent and well-fit with relevant skills and work experience, they can compete fairly with degree graduates in job applications or career advancement.

You, our readers, are the reason we exist. Your contributions allow us to bring fair and balanced news to everyone, regardless of the ability to donate. Support us by being our patron.

 

Featured image by Sean Chong.

If you like this article, Like the Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

by Sean Chong 

DURING the second United States presidential debate on Sunday night (Oct 10, Singapore time) Republican candidate Donald Trump defended himself from the sexually abusive comments he made about women in 2005 by calling it “locker room talk”. Mr Trump, who apologised for the remarks, said he has tremendous respect for women.

 

Featured image by Sean Chong.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

By Sean Chong

THINK of it as a bad dream. Madam Rosmah Mansor, founder of Permata, a youth welfare programme in Malaysia, was supposed to receive the Lead by Example Award from American non-profit Antiquities Coalition. But the coalition withdrew the award at the last minute, saying that it could not verify Permata’s source of funding. It also removed her name from the list of honourees. Read our full reporting here.

North Korea Missile (SIM), smack in the middle, kim jong un, PM Shinzo Abe

by Sean Chong

ON WEDNESDAY (Aug 24), North Korea conducted another missile test with a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) that flew about 500km before landing in the sea of Japan. Mr Shinzo Abe, Japan’s Prime Minister, denounced the test as an “unforgivable” act to regional stability.

Featured image by Sean Chong.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

Pokemon Go meets Hungry Ghost (SIM), pokemon catcher, hungry ghost festival, sim, smack in the middle

By Sean Chong

POKEMON Go finally came to Singapore – just as the gates of hell opened for the seventh month of the Lunar calendar.

Featured image by Sean Chong.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

by Sean Chong

THE National University of Singapore (NUS) has responded to reports of student leaders forcing students to participate in sexualised games during a recent orientation programme, which it said was “not being endorsed and cleared by relevant supervisors”. The school also said it would take “strong disciplinary action” against those responsible for the programme.

.

Featured image by Sean Chong.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

Britain's next PM

by Sean Chong

NOW that David Cameron is out of the picture, who’s in? It’s down to two women: Theresa May and Andrea Leadsom. We take a look at who else might have had their eyes on the prize.

 

Jeremy Corbyn

1. Jeremy Corbyn (Leader of the Labour Party) – Voted Remain

This is the “oblivious” man who “obviously” wanted Britain to get out. After being lambasted of leading Labour Party “into oblivion”, Mr Corbyn has made no contribution to Remain campaign and proved himself incapable of ensuring that Labour voters voted remain. What now? Everybody has urged him to resign, but he refused.

 

Theresa May

2. Theresa May (Home Secretary) – Voted Remain

“I’m the best person to be PM.”

Following the resignation of Mr Cameron, Mrs May launched her bid in the Tory party leadership race. She is by far the frontrunner (she won 199 MPs in the second round of voting). Despite having campaigned for Britain to stay in the EU, she has said she would respect the outcome of Brexit and believes she is the only person capable of uniting the party and country. She has also suggested that the status of EU nationals living in the UK would form part of the Brexit negotiations.

 

George Osborne

3. George Osborne (Chancellor of the Exchequer) – Voted Remain

Known perhaps as the “worrier” of the entire referendum, Mr Osborne had warned about the consequences of the post-Brexit economy. Following the EU vote, he proposed a reduction on corporation tax to “below 15 per cent – five points lower than its current 20 per cent rate” to boost Britain’s economy. Mr Osborne, however, has declared that he would not contest to be the next Prime Minister.

 

Michael Gove

4. Michael Gove (Justice Secretary) – Voted Leave

In a stunning backstabbing move, Mr Gove dropped a surprise “last-minute” bid to run in the Tory party leadership race and criticised Mr Johnson for being unable to “provide the leadership or build the team for the task ahead”. Some say that was his plan all along. Could he have been the next Prime Minister? Seems he doesn’t want to be – if you believe him, that is.

 

Boris Johnson

5. Boris Johnson (Leave Campaign Leader, Former Major of London) – Voted Leave

Bojo has lost his mojo. Mr Johnson was supposed to run in the Tory party leadership race to replace PM David Cameron, but he has bowed out suddenly. After consulting colleagues, he said he was not the right person for the role. “The next Tory leader would have to unify the party and the country’s Leave and Remain supporters to ensure Britain stand tall in the world,” he said. Many people believe his “last minute” withdrawal was due to being knifed by his campaign running mate, Mr Gove.

 

Nigel Farage

6. Nigel Farage (United Kingdom Independence Party UKIP) Voted Leave

Prime Minister? Nah. Not for the man who “[wants] his life back”. Known for this leadership in the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP), Mr Farage has been accused of stirring up anti-immigrant sentiments to push his agenda of leaving the EU. He’s done it, which is why it was time for him to resign, he said.

 

Gisela Stuart

7. Gisela Stuart (Chairman of the Vote Leave campaign, Labour MP & Birmingham MP) Voted Leave

Chairman of the official Vote Leave campaign during the referendum, Ms Stuart – according to the Birmingham Post – said after the vote was in: “It is now the responsibility for us as politicians to act in the best interest of the nation. Calm down, take cool steps, put that process in place.” But could she have been the next PM? Unlikely.

 

Andrea Leadsom

8. Andrea Leadsom (Energy & Climate Change Minister) – Voted Leave

Mrs Leadsom has joined the Tory party leadership race, claiming “this is something I really long to do”. She is opposed to Mrs May’s immigration proposal, stating that EU nationals in Britain will not be used as “bargaining chips”. In the latest vote by MPs, she defeated Mr Gove by receiving 84 votes, which put her straight into the final competition against Mrs May.

 

David Cameron

David Cameron (British Prime Minister & Conservative Party Leader) – Voted Remain

Whoever becomes the next PM, Mr Cameron will be remembered as the man who gambled away his country. His woes began in 2015 when he was facing a tough election, he promised that if his political party was elected, he would hold a referendum on whether Britain should stay in the EU. This has turned out to be a fatal miscalculation on his part, and he has resigned.

 

Featured image by Sean Chong

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

Yulin Dog Festival (v2)
Illustration by Sean Chong

by Sean Chong

PROTESTS against the annual Yulin Dog Meat Festival are all bark and no bite, and in fact may have contributed to the success of this year’s edition. In spite of a petition with 11 million signatures and a pledge from the local government last week to take “immediate actions” to prevent the festival from happening again, the festival went on without much of a hitch – as a matter of fact, Yulin locals reported fully booked hotels and dog meat flying off the shelves as international protests help point dog meat fans to the festival. Meanwhile debate still continues about whether it is okay to eat dogs on principle, although the point has been made that the current slaughter methods are inhumane, potentially unsanitary, and that the dogs are from unregulated sources and may include stolen pets. Will the noisy protests have their intended effect, or should activists put a muzzle on it and try to find other ways to end the slaughter?

.

Featured image by Sean Chong.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250

Child Abuse
Illustration by Sean Chong

by Sean Chong

IT’S a billion-dollar industry in the Philippines, and growing. Live-streaming child porn is enabled by a nation with good Internet access, smartphone penetration, English proficiency and a well-developed network for international money transfers, but which at the same time also suffers from the desperation of poverty and a weakness in laws and controls. Live-streamed child pornography is even harder to detect and punish – the process leaves no trace of pornography on the abuser’s computers, which makes gathering evidence much more difficult. Tens of thousands of children are estimated to be involved in this flesh trade, many of whom are pressed into what amounts to slavery by their own parents for between US$5 and 200 a “show” – just another way to keep the family fed. It becomes the new normal for children, who then tell their friends and neighbours. Soon, whole neighbourhoods get in on the idea to make ends meet. Some rescued children see nothing wrong with what they do and are even resentful of authorities who rescue them and lock their parents away. Can the Philippines put an end to such a deep-rooted problem?

Featured image by Sean Chong. 

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

skillsfuture_300x250