January 21, 2017

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GOVERNMENT officers will not be grouped merely by their educational qualifications from now on. This means that so long as poly diploma holders are competent and well-fit with relevant skills and work experience, they can compete fairly with degree graduates in job applications or career advancement.

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Featured image by Sean Chong.

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by Natassya Siregar

THE journey towards success is as vast as the sky. There is no telling what you will face on the journey. Being equipped with more skills helps you overcome and weather obstacles, and will allow you to soar high.

 

 

This article is part of a series on SkillsFuture, in collaboration with MOE and SSG. Read the other pieces here:

  1. Poly vs Private degrees: It’s not the money that matters
  2. Private degrees: data needs to tell a fuller skills story 
  3. 5 new jobs that didn’t exist a decade ago
  4. SMACK IN THE MIDDLE: Keys to success
  5. 5 skills employers want you to have in tomorrow’s job market
  6. Don’t underestimate ‘soft skills’ in your career
  7. 50 Faces: What is success to you?
  8. Got an F in school? There are still ‘100 ways’ to be successful

 

Featured image by Natassya Siregar.

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A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSPL0F

REUTERS

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks at a mask of himself as he speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2SEPF
TWO FACE: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump looks at a mask of himself as he speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, U.S. November 7, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

 

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (L) greets vice presidential nominee Mike Pence after Pence spoke during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSIYH1
POLITICAL COUPLE: Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump (left) greets vice presidential candidate Mike Pence after Pence spoke during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Mike Segar

 

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds babies at a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S., July 29, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSKBQJ
NANNY-IN-CHIEF: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds babies at a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S., July 29, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

 

Donald Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is seen after it was vandalized in Los Angeles, California U.S., October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2QL52
RAISING STAR?: Donald Trump’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as seen after it was vandalised in Los Angeles, California U.S., October 26, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

 

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump hugs a U.S. flag as he comes onstage to rally with supporters in Tampa, Florida, U.S. October 24, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTX2QA5N
I LOVE AMERICA: Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump hugs a U.S. flag as he comes onstage to rally with supporters in Tampa, Florida, U.S. October 24, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

 

A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSPL0F
MOUTHING OFF: A journalist records a video from a screen as Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlos Barria

 

A young boy high-fives Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump as his wife Melania watches as the candidate waits at the Seven Flags Event Center in Clive, Iowa February 1, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Bourg (UNITED STATES - TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX250R5
HI-FIVE: A young boy high-fives Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump as his wife Melania watches as the candidate waits at the Seven Flags Event Center in Clive, Iowa February 1, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Jim Bourg

 

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri - RTX2SKR2
COPYCAT: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

 

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2T2GN
PASSING THE BATON: U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

 

Audience member Robin Roy (C) reacts as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets her at a campaign rally in Lowell, Massachusetts January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX211IR
SHOCK WIN: Audience member Robin Roy (Centre) reacts as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets her at a campaign rally in Lowell, Massachusetts January 4, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Brian Snyder

 

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

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U.S. President elect Donald Trump speaks at election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

by REUTERS

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

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Children watch their mother vote during the U.S. general election in Greenville, North Carolina, U.S. on November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake - RTX2SM7K

REUTERS

 

 

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri - RTX2SKR2

REUTERS

 

Featured image, videos and text by REUTERS.

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by Natassya Siregar

HAVING good grades isn’t the only way to success – explore different life skills which can then unlock different paths to success.

 

This article is part of a series on SkillsFuture, in collaboration with MOE and SSG. Read the other pieces here:

1. Poly vs Private degrees: It’s not the money that matters

2. Private degrees: data needs to tell a fuller skills story 

3. 5 new jobs that didn’t exist a decade ago

5. 5 skills employers want you to have in tomorrow’s job market

6. Don’t underestimate ‘soft skills’ in your career

7. 50 Faces: What is success to you?

 

Featured image by Natassya Siregar.

If you like this article, Like The Middle Ground‘s Facebook Page as well!

For breaking news, you can talk to us via email.

A Red Panda searches for food inside a carved Halloween pumpkin in its enclosure as part of the Enchantment event at Chester Zoo in Chester, Britain October 24, 2016. REUTERS/Phil Noble - RTX2Q7AX

REUTERS

 

Featured image and video by REUTERS.

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by Najeer Yusof

FROM remote control helicopters to aerial drones used for photography and now: Racing drones.

Locally, there are a number of drone hobbyist shops, such as RP innovations Singapore (RPiSG) and Drone Matters, that cater to drone hobbyists and also provide commercial services such as aerial photography. On weekends, local drone hobbyists take their drones to open fields to test their flying skills.

Owner of RPiSG, Mr Roy Pwee, 42, said: “The evolution from remote control helicopters to first-person view (FPV) racing drones has been a rapid one. Starting with remote control cars and helicopters 20 years ago, I became involved in drone racing since 2014. I started the business of commercialising drones here in 2006, after seeing its market potential.”

Drone racing’s popularity has been growing ever since Dubai’s World Drone Prix early this year, which saw the winner, 15-year-old Luke Bannister, bring home $250,000. FPV drone racing first began as an amateur sport in Australia. To date, FPV drone races have been held on an international scale, in the United States, and in Dubai. With these large-scale races and ESPN, an American based cable, and television sports news, airing these races live, FPV drone racing also has the potential in becoming a recognised sport.

“There are racing drones which can be bought off the shelves and also those that can be built from scratch. Customising and building your own drone allows you to choose the type of parts to use and it also allows you to fix your drone easily if it malfunctions. This is not the case for the off-the-shelf one,” said Mr Xu Zhouhua, 28, manager of Drone Matters.

As these drones are becoming more affordable, FPV drone racing is gaining more enthusiasts both overseas and locally. Here, the FPV drone racing scene has been growing since 2014.

EQUIPMENT: An analog video receiver setup beside the pilots. This receiver is used to connect with the drone's camera and obtain live footage while it is flying. The problem with analog transmitters are the interference due to anyone being able to tap on the feed just by dialing in the right frequency. This will then make flying troublesome for the pilots. There are digital video receivers available in the market, which restricts who can tap in on the feed. However, it is more costly.
EQUIPMENT: An analog video receiver setup beside the pilots. This receiver is used to connect with the drone’s camera and obtain live footage while it is flying. The problem with analog transmitters is that anyone can tap into the feed with the right frequency, creating interference. This makes flying troublesome for the pilots. There are digital video receivers available in the market, that can restrict others from tapping into the feed. However, they cost more.

 

SPARES: A drone pilot fixing his drone, on top of his tool box. The toolbox is the healing pack for drone racers. It contains spare parts to every component of the drone. Since each drone is built according to the pilot's customizations, only the pilot knows how to fix his drone and the items in each toolbox varies. However, the standard essentials tend to be props, batteries, electronic flight controllers, transmitters, spanners and screw drivers.
SPARES: A drone pilot fixing his drone, on top of his tool box. The toolbox is the “healing pack” for drone racers. It contains spare parts to every component of the drone. Since each drone is built according to the pilot’s customisations, only the pilot knows how to fix his drone and the items in each toolbox vary. However, the standard essentials tend to be props, batteries, electronic flight controllers, transmitters, spanners, and screwdrivers.

 

BUDDY SYSTEM: Drone pilots and "spotters", racing in a monthly drone race sponsored by Drone Matters, a local drone shop. Hobbyist pilots and pilots from other drone shops take part in these monthly friendly races. Each pilot is paired with a "spotter", who taps into the pilot's video feed, and watches it via their own FPV goggle. The role of the "spotter" is to monitor if the pilot has completed the obstacles in the course and to also ensure if the pilot flies safely.
BUDDY SYSTEM: Drone pilots and “spotters”, racing in a monthly drone race sponsored by Drone Matters, a local drone shop. Hobbyist pilots and pilots from other drone shops take part in these monthly friendly races. Each pilot is paired with a “spotter”, who taps into the pilot’s video feed, and watches it via their own FPV goggle. The role of the “spotter” is to monitor if the pilot has completed the obstacles in the course and to ensure that the pilot flies safely.

 

RACE TRACK: Cones and gates that are part of the drone racing course. The cones dictate the course route, while the gates and flags serve as obstacles for the pilots to maneuver through and perform turns such as the slalom, hairpin, sweeper and tight radius.
RACE TRACK: Cones and gates that are part of the drone racing course. The cones dictate the course route, while the gates and flags serve as obstacles for the pilots to manoeuvre through and perform turns such as the slalom, hairpin, sweeper and tight radius. The drones are also flown below the height of the trees, for safety purposes. The races are won based on timing and completing the obstacles in the circuit.

 

CLOSE CONTACT: Two drones flying through a gate. Flying from first-person view is a challenge of its own. The pilot has to be alert and skillful in avoiding obstacles and flying through space constraints, all while flying at an average speed between 50 to 70 km/h. It is common for them to experience crashes and let a lone close shaves, by shaving off grass blades or leave, while flying the course. The unlucky few crash into obstacles or even other drones and end up with severe damage to their drones.
CLOSE CONTACT: Two drones flying through a gate. Flying with FPV is a challenge of its own. The pilot has to be alert and skillful to avoid obstacles while flying through space constraints, at an average speed between 50 to 70 km/h. It is common for drones to crash or to have close-shaves with the track terrain like trees and tall grasses while flying the course. The unlucky few crash into obstacles or even other drones and end up with severe damage.

 

MY GOGGLE IS COOLER: A pilot wearing his first-person view (FPV) google. The pilots fly their drones using the live feed from the camera attached to their drones. Their goggles pick up the feed that is transmitted from their drones, via an antenna. Flying with the FPV goggle, creates an illusion of flying in the drone and this is one of the main attractive nature of FPV drone racing.
LIVE VIEW: Mr Zacky Abdul Razak, 36, wearing his FPV goggle. The pilots fly their drones using the live feed from the camera attached to their drones. Their goggles pick up the feed that is transmitted from their drones, via an antenna. Flying with the FPV goggle creates the perception of actual flying and this is one of the main attractions of FPV drone racing.

 

HOW DO YOU LIKE YOU LIVE VIEW: A "spotter" using a screen to tap into the live feed of a pilot. Instead of using FPV goggles, one can also use screen monitors to fly the drones or monitor other pilots' feeds.
SPOT ME: A “spotter” using a screen to tap into the live feed of a pilot. Instead of using FPV goggles, one can also use screen monitors to fly the drones or monitor other pilots’ feeds.

 

QUAD-WHAT: A quadcoptor with LED lights attached to it. Quadcopters are drones which have four propellers. The average quadcopter is made up of a frame which holds the electrical speed controller, battery, camera and transmitters. Each propeller is attached to a motor and connected to a circuit board, on the frame. The entire setup can be customised, to the preference of the pilot. Some might even include LED lights. However, the more power consuming items you have on a drone, the shorter your flight time. The average flight time tends to hover between two to three minutes.
FLYING MACHINES: A quadcopter with LED lights attached to it. Quadcopters are drones which have four propellers. The average quadcopter is made up of a frame which holds the electrical speed controller, battery, camera, and transmitters. Each propeller is attached to a motor and connected to a circuit board, on the frame. The entire setup can be customised, to the preference of the pilot. Some might even include LED lights. However, the more power-consuming items you have on a drone, the shorter your flight time. The average flight time tends to hover between two and three minutes.

 

DRONE RACING: A racing drone hovering beside Mr Lai Choon How, 45. Drone pilots control the drone based on the live feed from the drone camera's, instead of looking directly at the drone's location. This creates the perception of actual flying for the pilot. "First-person view makes you feel like you are really flying and that's exciting. it is also safe as the drone is the only one crashing," said: Mr How. The commercial photographer has spent about $7000 in total on racing drones and has participated in about 3 local competitions thus far.
IN THE PILOT SEAT: A racing drone hovering beside Mr Lai Choon How, 45. Drone pilots control the drone based on the live feed from the drone cameras, instead of looking directly at the drone’s location. This creates the perception of actual flying for the pilot. “The first-person view makes you feel like you are really flying and that’s exciting. It is also safe as the drone is the only one crashing,” said Mr Lai. The commercial photographer has spent about $7,000 in total on racing drones and has participated in about three local competitions thus far.

 

CARPARKS FLYING:Drones flying by in a multi story carpark. Pilots from Roy Ph (RPiSG), have weekly recreational flies, at a multi story carpark, at night. "I find flying in carparks more interesting as requires more skillful flying, with greater flight restrictions, such as the high and even sharper turns," said: Mr Yi Ming, 37, one of the pilots from RPiSG.
RECREATIONAL FLIGHT TIME: Drones flying by in a multistorey carpark. Drone pilots from RPiSG, meet weekly to fly their drones, at a multistorey carpark, at night. “I find flying in carparks more interesting as it requires more skillful flying, with greater flight restrictions, such as the height and even sharper turns,” said Mr Yi Ming, 37, a drone pilot from RPiSG.

 

COOL DADS: Pilots from RPiSG, flying their drones in a multistory carpark. (From left): Mr Dave Tang, 34, Mr Lai Choon How, 45, Mr Yi Ming, 37, and Mr Ryu Goh, 33 met via facebook as drone flying enthusiasts and have been flying on a weekly basis. "We are dads and have full time jobs. So can only fly at night after our children have gone to bed and this place gives us the opportunity to do so," said: Mr Tang. Mr Tang was inspired to pick up drone racing after watching youtube videos of drone racing in carparks, overseas. He posted his videos on facebook and was contacted by the others. So he gathered them and organised weekly drone flies.
PILOT DADS: Drone pilots from RPiSG, flying their drones in a multistorey carpark. (From left): Mr Ryu Goh, 34, Mr Lai, Mr Yi, and Mr Dave Tang, 33, met via Facebook as drone enthusiasts and have been flying on a weekly basis. “We are all dads and have full-time jobs. So can only fly at night after our children have gone to bed and this place gives us the opportunity to do so,” said Mr Tang. Mr Tang was inspired to pick up drone racing after watching Youtube videos of drone racing in carparks, overseas. He posted his videos on Facebook and was contacted by the others. So he gathered them and organised weekly drone meets.

 

Featured image and other images by Najeer Yusof.

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A portrait of Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej stands as people memorialize his death at the Wat Thai of Los Angeles temple in Los Angeles, California, U.S., October 13, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
REUTERS

EIGHTY-EIGHT years of age when he died, King Bhumibol Adulyadej was widely revered in Thailand and seen as a unifying force in an often turbulent country.

His reign began in 1946 and lasted seven decades. During that time, he intervened when protests, coups and other political upheavals threatened to plunge Thailand into crisis.

His final year was marked by various health ailments. He was most recently battling a respiratory infection and had been treated for kidney failure this month.

 

 

Featured image and video by REUTERS.

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