March 27, 2017

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By Sean Chong

THINK of it as a bad dream. Madam Rosmah Mansor, founder of Permata, a youth welfare programme in Malaysia, was supposed to receive the Lead by Example Award from American non-profit Antiquities Coalition. But the coalition withdrew the award at the last minute, saying that it could not verify Permata’s source of funding. It also removed her name from the list of honourees. Read our full reporting here.

A still image captured from a video from WABC television shows a conscious man believed to be New York bombing suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami being loaded into an ambulance after a shoot-out with police in Linden, New Jersey, U.S., September 19, 2016. Courtesy WABC-TV via REUTERS

REUTERS

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POLICE on Monday arrested an Afghanistan-born American who they suspect of detonating a bomb in the heart of New York City and planting other devices, capturing the 28-year-old in a dramatic gun battle that wounded him and two officers.

Officials did not offer any information on the possible motives of Ahmad Khan Rahami, but they said they were not looking for other suspects. New York’s mayor said the bombing that injured 29 people in the bustling Chelsea district was “an act of terror.”

Police in Linden, New Jersey, swooped in on Rahami just hours after authorities publicly identified him as the prime suspect in the Saturday night blast and sent out an alert to millions of mobile phone users.

Authorities suspect Rahami, who lived in the neighbouring town of Elizabeth, was also behind a bomb that exploded on the New Jersey shore on Saturday, a device found near the New York blast, and up to six more devices found near the Elizabeth train station on Sunday night. The bombings and subsequent manhunt prompted even greater security in America’s biggest city, already on high alert for the gathering of world leaders at the United Nations in New York for the annual General Assembly this week. An additional 1,000 officers were deployed.

Police in Linden were responding to a complaint by a bar owner of a man sleeping in the closed establishment’s entranceway.

“The officer realised that this might be the person that the FBI was looking for. The officer then said, ‘show me your hands,’ and the person went to the side of his body and pulled out a handgun and fired a round at the officer, striking him in the abdomen. Fortunately, the officer had his bulletproof vest on,” Linden Police Captain James Sarnicki told reporters.

Rahami indiscriminately opened fired on police, officials said, injuring another officer with broken glass that struck his forehead.

Police fired back, wounding Rahami in the arm and leg. Eyewitness video showed Rahami handcuffed in a gurney, his wounds bandaged, before he was taken to hospital for surgery. His condition was not considered life threatening, police said.

Focusing just on the shootout, the Union County Prosecutor’s Office charged Rahami with five counts of attempted murder in the first degree and two second-degree weapons charges, spokesman Mark Spivey said.

More charges were likely in federal court but Preet Bharara, the US attorney for the southern district of New York, said authorities would take their time.

‘DEMON RAGE’

Rahami had not previously been identified as dangerous but his family was known to police as a result of late-night noise and crowd complaints at a family halal chicken restaurant in Elizabeth.

“This is a criminal, sick act and it’s an idea that is coming from abroad and spilling over into the youth and this demon rage,” said Salaam Ismial, a social worker at Masjid Al-Hadi, a mosque in Elizabeth, and who said he knew Rahami.

“A rightful Muslim would denounce this violence. The Koran is very clear on this.”

Investigators said they had not yet determined a motive for the bombings and there was no indication that an extremist cell was operating in the area, William Sweeney of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s New York division told a news conference.

Five people who had been taken into custody in Brooklyn late on Sunday for questioning after being observed by law enforcement officers at a location associated with Rahami were released without charges, Sweeney said.

US President Barack Obama, who spoke by phone with some of the officers involved in the arrest, praised police for the quick apprehension and said he saw no connection between the explosions and a separate weekend incident where a man stabbed nine people at a mall in central Minnesota before being shot dead.

The Minnesota attacker was described a “soldier of the Islamic State”, the militant group’s news agency said.

Authorities believe Rahami was responsible for the bomb that ripped through Manhattan’s Chelsea neighbourhood on Saturday night, an unexploded pressure cooker bomb found four blocks away, plus a bomb that exploded 130km away earlier on Saturday at a Marine charity race on the New Jersey shore.

US authorities also believe the devices found in Elizabeth are linked to the Chelsea bombing, Homeland Security Officials told Reuters.

Two men walking past the Elizabeth train station on Sunday evening noticed a backpack left in a trash bin and took it, thinking it might contain valuables, Elizabeth Mayor Chris Bollwage told reporters. They called police when they noticed wires and a pipe inside.

As many as five potential explosive devices tumbled out when it was emptied, Bollwage said. After cordoning off the area, a bomb squad used a robot to cut a wire to try to disable the device and set off an explosion, he said.

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Featured image and text by REUTERS.

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by Natassya Diana

CAN you find your way home during this Formula 1 week?

 

Featured image by Natassya Diana.

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Airline passengers walk past a banner about the Zika virus shortly after landing from Singapore at Soekarno-Hatta airport in Jakarta, Indonesia August 30, 2016. The banner reads "Careful mosquitos spread Zika." Picture taken August 30, 2016. REUTERS/Beawiharta - RTX2O6SQ

by TMG Visuals

THE Indonesian Health Ministry said yesterday (Sept 15) that it has installed larvae traps around its airport terminals as one of the measures to prevent the spreading of Zika virus amid an outbreak in Singapore.

At the Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta, one of the busiest airports in Southeast Asia, authorities prepared about 1,000 larvae traps, placing them in the garden, arrival and departure hall, offices, toilets and all public areas across three terminals.

The trap provides an artificial ground for mosquitoes to lay eggs and the chemical in the container will kill the larvae in it. Health officials hope this will effectively reduce the population of mosquitoes.

This is the latest measure carried out by the Indonesia air transport hub following a Zika outbreak in Singapore. It has also enforced thermal scanning on all passengers arriving from here since last month.

Singapore reported its first locally-infected Zika patient on August 27 and since then, the number of reported infections has soared to more than 300. Thailand has recorded about 200 cases of Zika since January, increasing fears that Indonesia, a country of 250 million population, could be exposed to the virus.

“There are about 6,000 passengers arriving from Singapore almost everyday. We monitor and check the body temperature of arrival passengers with thermal scanners, no one so far has been detected (as a possible virus carrier),” said Mr Susanto, a health official who goes by only one name.

“Apparently, not all of them show overheating symptoms like dengue, some of them could be suffering from fever that is under 38 degrees. So the most important thing to do is not let mosquitoes spread around the airport area, therefore we installed these larvae traps in the whole airport area.”

The installation is part of the Indonesian government’s disease prevention programme called “3M”.

Said Mr Oscar Primadi, head of the communication department of Indonesia’s Health Ministry: “The airport, as the entrance (to the nation), is important when it comes to protecting us from Zika. This method can help. We will continue the effort because it is part of the government’s ‘3M’ prevention measure.”

“This is one of the methods that is effective in eradicating the population of mosquitoes. So, I would like to reiterate that, we will advocate this method to the public as it has been proven to be an efficient technology. We will do anything we can to curb the growing of the mosquitoes,” he added.

The Zika virus, which has spread through the Americas and the Caribbean since late last year, is generally a mild disease but is a particular risk to pregnant women. It has been linked to microcephaly – a severe birth defect in which babies are born with abnormally small heads and underdeveloped brains.

 

Featured image by REUTERS.

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by TMG visuals

MISTER Andy Tian’s family has been in the mooncake business since 1939, when his grandfather first opened a Chinese confectionery shop. Then, they made Chinese confectionery such as Tao Sa Pia and peanut candies, and of course mooncakes. But mooncakes were made only during the Mid-Autumn Mid-Autumn festive period. His dad took over the business and started Lee Guan Cake Shop in 1978. When he was growing up, Mr Tian used to help out at the shop after school. He soon picked up some baking skills and learned to make a variety of Chinese confectionery, including the mooncakes. Today, the 53-year-old runs the business with his younger brother Robin Tian, 49, and his dad, who still refuses to retire.

During the Mid-Autumn Festival period, Lee Guan Cake Shop makes an average of about 1,200 mooncakes a day. They mostly supply to hotels and restaurants which then repackage the mooncakes for sale. They also sell their mooncakes and other Chinese confectionery at their shop along Chai Chee Street.

According to Mr Tian, currently there are no more than 10 of such traditional Chinese confectionery shops in Singapore. The family business has shrunk significantly since the 80s when they used to supply a total of about 40,000 mooncakes yearly. These days, the figure has been reduced by half. They even had a factory in Sembawang, where they made their confectionery for two years. The family closed that factory two months ago.

“These days, not many people are buying Chinese confectionery as youngsters are not very keen on these kinds of pastries,” said Mr Tian. Still, he is determined to carry on his family’s legacy.

 

 

 

Feature image and video by Tan Wei Jie and Suzannah Lucia.

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by Najeer Yusof

FOR the past four years Muslim foreign workers from the dormitories along Kian Teck Avenue have been gathering along the pavements to pray the Eid Adha prayers. Since the nearest mosque is quite a distance from their dormitories, they have decided to organise their own prayers, just outside their dormitories.

There are about 2,000 Muslim foreign workers and a total of three different groups organising the prayers. Each group prays at a different time slot to cater to the population. TMG observed the group that conducted their prayers along Kian Teck Cresent. They began laying the canvas and setting up the sound system at around 6.30am and the prayers commenced at 7.30am.

 

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SERMON: The sermon for Eid Adha prayers are read from this book. They are in Arabic and come with Bengali translations. Two sermons were read out for the Eid Adha prayers. These sermons are similar to those read in all the mosques in Bangladesh.

 

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SOUND SYSTEM: A speaker secured to the trunk of a tree using raffia string. The Imam, who leads the prayers, wears a microphone set around his neck, as he delivers the sermon and the prayer commands. There are two speakers placed along the street to magnify the Imam’s dictation for the huge turnout of foreign workers. About 1,000 Muslim workers joined the prayers today and that has been the average turnout.

 

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NEW CLOTHES: A fellow worker ties a turban around the cap of his friend before heading for prayers. The wearing of the turban around the cap was a practice of Prophet Muhammad. Turbans have been worn by the Arabs even before Islam was adopted and the turban is worn in a reversed manner, with excess cloth hanging at the back of the turban for shielding’s one’s face during sandstorms.

 

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THE IMAM: Mr Mohammad Botchan, 26, has led both the Eid Adha and Eid Fitr prayers for four years. He has memorised the entire Quran, as part of his Islamic Studies in Bangladesh. After his parents passed away, he had to support his siblings and decided to come to Singapore to work as the pay was better. Since Islamic Studies would not land him a job in Singapore, he acquired the skills of piping and welding in Bangladesh. He came to Singapore in 2009 and has been working for Alpha Engineering Private Limited, in Keppel Shipyard, for seven years. “Anyone can come and pray. The police watch us every day, as we conduct our daily prayers here too, but there is no problem. The Singapore Government also understands that we are only conducting prayers and not misleading anyone. We just want to encourage our fellow men to continue practising the teachings of Islam and not be misled,” said Mr Botchan. Mr Botchan was able to get his siblings married off after coming to work in Singapore and plans to get married in Bangladesh after his work permit expires in July.

 

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ASKING FOR FORGIVENESS: Muslim foreign workers crying as they ask for forgiveness. After the prayer, the Imam leads the rest with asking for forgiveness and seeking blessings. This portion is done with the cupping of both hands as a symbol, and one can ask God for anything he wishes.

 

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‘EID MUBARAK’: Muslim foreign workers from the first group embracing one another after the prayers and wishing each other a blessed Eid Adha, as the second group, also about 1,000 strong, prepares for their prayers. There were two groups led by different Imams and they led their prayers at different time slots, one at 7.30am and another at 8am. The different time slots were to cater for the huge population of Muslim foreign workers from all the dormitories along Kian Teck Avenue.

 

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MEALTIME: Muslim foreign workers from the first group enjoying a meal together after the prayers. One of the fellow workers prepared the meal in the morning before the prayers. The meal was served in huge round plates and the workers sat in groups of fives, around each plate.

 

All images by Najeer Yusof.

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Chiara Micheletti helps her mother Marisa Vesco take a shower in Cossato, Italy, June 7, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life she was not able to bathe herself. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMRJ

GAIA SQUARCI/ REUTERS

Marisa Vesco eats ice cream in her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 30, 2015. Marisa suffered from liver cancer and a loss of appetite during the last months of her life; eating ice cream was one of her few pleasures. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMRF
LIFE PLEASURES: Marisa Vesco eats ice cream in her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 30, 2015. Marisa suffered from liver cancer and a loss of appetite during the last months of her life; eating ice cream was one of her few pleasures. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

MY GRANDMOTHER’S life and mine overlapped for 27 years. I always called her “Nonna.”

Our age difference and profoundly contrasting values and way of thinking did not prevent us from developing a strong bond and a relationship punctuated by mischievous games and moments of tenderness and humour. We were amused by our differences.

“You know, I was still young when you were born,” she told me a few weeks before she died. “It’s a little like we grew up together.”

At a lunch table a few months earlier in Milan, I learned from my mother, her daughter, that Nonna, 85, suffered from incurable liver cancer. Years before, she had already survived two bouts of breast cancer.

 

Old family photographs are seen on Marisa VescoÕs bed as she works on creating a family album with her granddaughter, the photographer Gaia Squarci in Cossato, Italy, July 1, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMSH
PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY: Old family photographs are seen on Marisa Vesco’s bed as she works on creating a family album with her granddaughter, the photographer. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

Nonna would tell me time and time again that the news of my birth had given her the strength to fight.

When I learned that she was sick again, I had just landed in Italy, where I would be for only three days before flying back to New York.

Even more heartbreaking than the fear of saying goodbye to her was the fact that my grandmother did not know how sick she was. My mother and aunt believed she could not bear the thought of a third bout with cancer, this time, affecting her liver. Nonna was told by family members that her liver was ill.

 

Chiara Micheletti helps to bathe her mother Marisa Vesco in Milan, Italy May 21, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life needed assistance. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMS3
MOTHER AND DAUGHTER: Chiara Micheletti helps to bathe her mother Marisa Vesco in Milan, Italy May 21, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life needed assistance. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

No one ever mentioned the word “cancer.”

Because of this, one question haunted us until the day she died: Did we have the right to know the truth about her condition when she did not?

Nonna spent most of her last months at home, surrounded by family. She reconciled with the idea of death and said she could slowly feel it coming.

Doctors felt that surgery and chemotherapy would be pointless.

 

Marisa VescoÕs perfume bottles, almost all of which were empty, sit on the edge of the bath at her home in Cossato, Italy, February 5, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMSD
A WHIFF OF THE PAST: Marisa Vesco’s perfume bottles, almost all of which were empty, sit on the edge of the bath at her home in Cossato, Italy, February 5, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

In the midst of all this, I realised my mother was losing her mother.

After moving back to Italy for a few months, I witnessed the range of my mother’s emotions and the energy she devoted to the time they had left together.

Nonna’s world shrank to a few walls and fewer streets. In this narrow existence, every detail and daily act took on deeper meaning.

 

The pills taken by Marisa Vesco to alleviate the symptoms of liver cancer are photographed on her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 23, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMSF
DAILY SUSTENANCE: The pills taken by Marisa Vesco to alleviate the symptoms of liver cancer. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

One of the things my mother treasured most was giving her mother a bath. She did not hesitate to touch her old body, and she did not want others to do it on her behalf.

I joined my mother and grandmother in the bathroom to quietly observe them with my camera.

 

Marisa Vesco reaches for a magazine in a bedroom of her apartment in Cossato, Italy, June 7, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMR1
REQUIRED READING: Marisa Vesco reaches for a magazine in a bedroom of her apartment. She joked about the photos taken by the photographer appearing on the magazine covers. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

As I experienced those precious moments, I imagined myself at an older age and thought about how time changes one’s perspective on being a woman.

As my grandmother faced my lens, completely naked, her body bearing the signs of past and present illnesses, she did not show the slightest bit of shame – only trust and pride.

 

Marisa Vesco embraces her nephew Luca Squarci during a visit to Cossato, Italy, June 22, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMSQ
HUGS: Marisa Vesco embraces her nephew Luca Squarci during a visit to Cossato, Italy. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

If you spoke with people in Nonna’s town they would say she never left the house without being enveloped in a cloud of perfume, her white hair perfectly coiffed and her face tinged with makeup.

I was surprised by the way she confronted being ill without losing her femininity. She was able to poke fun at herself. More than once she asked me, “Am I going to end up on Vogue or Marie Claire?”

 

Chiara Micheletti embraces her mother Marisa Vesco in her room at a hospice where she stayed for a month and a half before her death in Biella, Italy, August 21, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMR5
BY HER SIDE: Chiara Micheletti embraces her mother Marisa Vesco in her room at a hospice where she stayed for a month and a half before her death in Biella, Italy, August 21, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

On October 11, 2015, the day Nonna died in Biella, Italy, I was across the world in Brooklyn, New York. I had spent five months with her, celebrating her life instead of mourning her death.

I remember taking a walk through the Greenpoint neighbourhood of Brooklyn and staring for a while at kids competing in a race. I was unable to come to terms with the fact she was no longer a part of the world around me.

I struggled with the concept of death and the abstract emotion we call grief. I found peace only when I returned to Italy to spread Nonna’s ashes.

 

Marisa VescoÕs ashes are spread by her nephew Luca Squarci at her favourite location where she grew up near Cossato, Italy, December 16, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMRC
FAREWELL: Marisa Vesco’s ashes are spread by her nephew Luca Squarci at her favourite location where she grew up near Cossato, Italy, December 16, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

My family and I walked to Nonna’s favourite place in the mountains not far from Cossato in northwestern Italy, the town in which she had grown up.

Her ashes felt heavy in my hands. I threw them far up into the air, and they fell all over the grass, and all over me. My mother, brother and aunt did the same, again and again.

In the end, we were covered in Nonna’s ashes and so was the field around us.

Months later, my mother sent me a photograph of that field. It was completely covered in flowers.

 

Featured image by Gaia Squarci/ REUTERS.

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A tapestry depicting Mother Teresa of Calcutta is seen in the facade of Saint Peter's Basilica during a mass, celebrated by Pope Francis, for her canonisation in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini - RTX2O1TQ

REUTERS

POPE Francis proclaimed Mother Teresa of Calcutta a saint of the Roman Catholic Church on Sunday (September 4), 19 years after her death.

Thousands of pilgrims in St Peter’s Square applauded as the diminutive nun known as the “Saint of the Gutters” in her lifetime was officially elevated to join the Church’s more than 10,000 saints.

Francis’ predecessor Pope John Paul II bent Vatican rules to fast-track Mother Teresa to sainthood two years after she died in 1997.

The process usually does not start until at least five years after the candidate’s death.

Pilgrims streamed into St Peter’s Square at the Vatican from the early morning ahead of a service to honour the Nobel peace laureate, who worked among the world’s neediest in the slums of the Indian city now known as Kolkata.

Her legacy complements Pope Francis’ vision of a humble church that strives to serve the poor, and the festivities are a highlight of his Holy Year of Mercy, which runs until November 8.

 

Featured image by REUTERS.

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Or is it “Hello Zika”? 

 

Check out our other articles about Zika:

  1. And while we’re dealing with the haze, Zika is here
  2. Zika vs Dengue
  3. Zika: MOH under fire for not doing enough
  4. Tuesdays at Ipster Cafe: Zika Zombie Apocalypse
  5. The haze that’s shrouding Zika

Featured image by Sean Chong.

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HALF-MAST: The state flag on top of the Parliament House, flying at half-mast. State flags on all government buildings were required to be flown at half-mast from Tuesday, Aug 23, till Friday, as a symbol of respect to the late Mr S. R. Nathan.

by Najeer Yusof

FORMER President Mr S. R. Nathan died on Monday, Aug 22, at the age of 92. His body was brought to his home along Ceylon Road on Tuesday and he lay in state at the Parliament House on Thursday. The state funeral procession took place on Friday, at 2pm. The ceremonial 25-pounder gun bearing his casket drove by landmarks of significance to him, such as the old City Hall and Fullerton Hotel before heading to National University of Singapore’s University Cultural Centre for the state funeral service. Here is a series of photos documenting the funeral from Tuesday:

 

HALF-MAST: The state flag on top of the Parliament House, flying at half-mast. State flags on all government buildings were required to be flown at half-mast from Tuesday, Aug 23, till Friday, as a symbol of respect to the late Mr S. R. Nathan.
HALF-MAST: The state flag on top of the Parliament House flying at half-mast. State flags on all government buildings were required to be flown at half-mast on Tuesday, Aug 23, till Friday, as a symbol of respect to the late Mr S. R. Nathan.

 

SLOW AND SOLEMN: The casket bearing the body of Mr S. R. Nathan arrived at his home along Ceylon Road from the Singapore General Hospital, on Tuesday morning, Aug 23, at around 10.45am. Eight pallbearers carrying the casket on their shoulders marched slowly into his house.
SLOW AND SOLEMN: The casket bearing the body of Mr S. R. Nathan arrived at his home along Ceylon Road from the Singapore General Hospital, on Tuesday morning, Aug 23, at around 10.45am. Eight pallbearers carrying the casket on their shoulders marched slowly into his house.

 

FINAL NOTES: A lady reading the messages of condolence left by others on the condolence boards at the Istana. 9 condolence boards were set up outside the Istana on Tuesday, Aug 23. Small white cards and pens were provided for the public to pen their messages for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. These cards were then slotted into the pockets of the condolence boards. The crowd was not as huge as compared to when the boards were set up previously for the passing on of Singapore's first Prime Minister, Mr Lee Kuan Yew.
FINAL NOTES: A lady reading the messages of condolence left by others on the condolence boards at the Istana. 9 condolence boards were set up outside the Istana on Tuesday, Aug 23. Small white cards and pens were provided for the public to pen their messages for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. These cards were then slotted into the pockets of the condolence boards. The crowd was not as huge as compared to when the boards were set up previously for the passing on of Singapore’s first Prime Minister, Mr Lee Kuan Yew.

 

E-TRIBUTE: Electronic display screen along Raffles Place MRT station featuring a tribute to Mr S. R. Nathan. Between intervals of advertisements, the screens of these electronic boards featured a picture of Mr Nathan and a message of tribute.
E-TRIBUTE: Electronic display screen along Raffles Place MRT station featuring a tribute to Mr S. R. Nathan. Between advertisements, the screens of these electronic boards featured a picture of Mr Nathan and a message.

 

PERSONAL TOUCH: Some members of the public brought flower bouquets and personalised boards with messages of gratitude for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. They were directed to place them on any one of the four tables beside the condolence boards along Saint Andrew's Road.
PERSONAL TOUCH: Some members of the public brought flower bouquets and personalised boards with messages of gratitude for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. They were directed to place them on any one of the four tables beside the condolence boards along Saint Andrew’s Road.

 

PAYING THEIR RESPECTS: The public heading to the Parliament House to pay their respects to the late Mr S. R. Nathan. Mr Nathan's body was brought to the Parliament House on Thursday, to lie in state. The public were allowed to pay their respects from 10am till 10pm. Throughout the day, people came to pay their respects and at 10pm, over 20,000 people has visited Mr Nathan.
PAYING THEIR RESPECTS: The public heading to the Parliament House to pay their respects to the late Mr S. R. Nathan. Mr Nathan’s body was brought to the Parliament House on Thursday, to lie in state. The public was allowed to pay their respects from 10am till 10pm. It was reported by the Straits Times that over 20,000 people had visited Mr Nathan on Thursday.

 

TENTAGES AND SIGNAGES: Temporary tentages and barricades were set up on the Padang, by the state funeral committee, to shade the public that were queuing up to pay their respects to Mr S. R. Nathan. The queues was only present during the day, as the crowd subsided by the evening. There were sign boards set up to signal the waiting time and they were placed along the queues during the day. However, these board were later removed, when the crowd subsided.
TENTAGES AND SIGNAGES: Temporary tentages and barricades were set up on the Padang, by the state funeral committee, to shade the public that was queuing up to pay their respects to Mr S. R. Nathan. The queues were only present during the day, as the crowd subsided by the evening. There were sign boards set up to signal the waiting time and they were placed within the queues during the day. However, these boards were later removed when the crowd subsided.

 

FREE WAFFLES: Ms Keish Lim, 23, stood alongside her mother Mdm Alice Lim, 54 (left), to gave out free waffles to the public leaving the Parliament House. Ms Keish Lim, who owns and runs, House of Waffros, a waffles stall at the coffeshop along Everton Park, brought along 55 pieces of waffles to the Parliament House yesterday. "My mother wanted to pay respects to Mr S. R. Nathan and told me make some waffles to give them out as a form of gratitude to the late Mr Nathan," said Ms Lim. She took about 5 hours in total to make the waffles and they came in five flavours: ham and cheese, azuki red bean, peanut, nutella and salted egg. After paying her respects with her mother, she started giving out the waffles around 8pm and by 8.30pm she was down to the last tray. She closed her stall two hours earlier, before heading to the Parliament House.
FREE WAFFLES: Ms Keish Lim, 23, stood alongside her mother Madam Alice Lim, 54, (left), and gave out free waffles to the public leaving the Parliament House on Thursday. Ms Lim, who owns and runs House of Waffros, a waffles stall at the coffee shop along Everton Park, brought along 55 pieces of waffle to the Parliament House yesterday. “My mother wanted to pay her respects to Mr S. R. Nathan and told me to make something to give out as a form of gratitude to the late Mr Nathan. So I decided to make waffles,” said Ms Lim. She took about five hours to make the waffles and they came in five different flavours: ham and cheese, azuki red bean, peanut, Nutella and salted egg. After paying her respects to Mr Nathan with her mother, she started giving out the waffles at around 8pm and by 8.30pm she was down to the last tray. She had closed her stall two hours earlier before heading to the Parliament House.

 

The ceremonial 25-pounder gun carriage carrying Mr S R Nathan's casket passed by the former City Hall today afternoon. After Lying-in-State at the Parliament House yesterday, Mr S R Nathan's casket was carried for a state funeral procession at 2pm. Beginning at the Parliament House, where he opened the Parliament on five occasions, as the President, his casket passed by other landmarks of significance to him such as the former City Hall. This was where the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) was located. Mr Nathan was a pioneer of the MFA in 1966 and spent a large portion of his career as part of the Foreign Service for Singapore. The funeral procession also passed by Fullerton Hotel and NTUC Centre. The procession ended at NUS's University Cultural Centre, for a State Funeral Service. Subsequently, his body was taken to the Mandai Crematorium for a private cremation.
FUNERAL PROCESSION: The ceremonial 25-pounder gun carriage carrying Mr S. R. Nathan’s casket, passing by Saint Andrew’s Road. After Lying-in-State at the Parliament House, Mr Nathan’s casket was carried for a state funeral procession at 2pm on Friday. Beginning at the Parliament House, where he opened Parliament on five occasions as President, his casket passed by other landmarks of significance to him such as the former City Hall, Fullerton Hotel and National Trades Union Congress Centre. The public gathered along the procession route, on sidewalks, to bid their final farewell. The procession ended at National University of Singapore’s University Cultural Centre, for a state funeral service.

 

All images by Najeer Yusof.

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