January 21, 2017

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A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSPL0F

REUTERS

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks at a mask of himself as he speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2SEPF
TWO FACE: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump looks at a mask of himself as he speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Florida, U.S. November 7, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

 

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (L) greets vice presidential nominee Mike Pence after Pence spoke during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSIYH1
POLITICAL COUPLE: Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump (left) greets vice presidential candidate Mike Pence after Pence spoke during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Mike Segar

 

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds babies at a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S., July 29, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSKBQJ
NANNY-IN-CHIEF: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds babies at a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S., July 29, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

 

Donald Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is seen after it was vandalized in Los Angeles, California U.S., October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2QL52
RAISING STAR?: Donald Trump’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as seen after it was vandalised in Los Angeles, California U.S., October 26, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

 

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump hugs a U.S. flag as he comes onstage to rally with supporters in Tampa, Florida, U.S. October 24, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTX2QA5N
I LOVE AMERICA: Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump hugs a U.S. flag as he comes onstage to rally with supporters in Tampa, Florida, U.S. October 24, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

 

A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSPL0F
MOUTHING OFF: A journalist records a video from a screen as Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlos Barria

 

A young boy high-fives Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump as his wife Melania watches as the candidate waits at the Seven Flags Event Center in Clive, Iowa February 1, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Bourg (UNITED STATES - TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX250R5
HI-FIVE: A young boy high-fives Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump as his wife Melania watches as the candidate waits at the Seven Flags Event Center in Clive, Iowa February 1, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Jim Bourg

 

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri - RTX2SKR2
COPYCAT: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

 

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX2T2GN
PASSING THE BATON: U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

 

Audience member Robin Roy (C) reacts as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets her at a campaign rally in Lowell, Massachusetts January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTX211IR
SHOCK WIN: Audience member Robin Roy (Centre) reacts as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets her at a campaign rally in Lowell, Massachusetts January 4, 2016. Photo By: REUTERS/Brian Snyder

 

 

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U.S. President elect Donald Trump speaks at election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

by REUTERS

 

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by Najeer Yusof

FROM remote control helicopters to aerial drones used for photography and now: Racing drones.

Locally, there are a number of drone hobbyist shops, such as RP innovations Singapore (RPiSG) and Drone Matters, that cater to drone hobbyists and also provide commercial services such as aerial photography. On weekends, local drone hobbyists take their drones to open fields to test their flying skills.

Owner of RPiSG, Mr Roy Pwee, 42, said: “The evolution from remote control helicopters to first-person view (FPV) racing drones has been a rapid one. Starting with remote control cars and helicopters 20 years ago, I became involved in drone racing since 2014. I started the business of commercialising drones here in 2006, after seeing its market potential.”

Drone racing’s popularity has been growing ever since Dubai’s World Drone Prix early this year, which saw the winner, 15-year-old Luke Bannister, bring home $250,000. FPV drone racing first began as an amateur sport in Australia. To date, FPV drone races have been held on an international scale, in the United States, and in Dubai. With these large-scale races and ESPN, an American based cable, and television sports news, airing these races live, FPV drone racing also has the potential in becoming a recognised sport.

“There are racing drones which can be bought off the shelves and also those that can be built from scratch. Customising and building your own drone allows you to choose the type of parts to use and it also allows you to fix your drone easily if it malfunctions. This is not the case for the off-the-shelf one,” said Mr Xu Zhouhua, 28, manager of Drone Matters.

As these drones are becoming more affordable, FPV drone racing is gaining more enthusiasts both overseas and locally. Here, the FPV drone racing scene has been growing since 2014.

EQUIPMENT: An analog video receiver setup beside the pilots. This receiver is used to connect with the drone's camera and obtain live footage while it is flying. The problem with analog transmitters are the interference due to anyone being able to tap on the feed just by dialing in the right frequency. This will then make flying troublesome for the pilots. There are digital video receivers available in the market, which restricts who can tap in on the feed. However, it is more costly.
EQUIPMENT: An analog video receiver setup beside the pilots. This receiver is used to connect with the drone’s camera and obtain live footage while it is flying. The problem with analog transmitters is that anyone can tap into the feed with the right frequency, creating interference. This makes flying troublesome for the pilots. There are digital video receivers available in the market, that can restrict others from tapping into the feed. However, they cost more.

 

SPARES: A drone pilot fixing his drone, on top of his tool box. The toolbox is the healing pack for drone racers. It contains spare parts to every component of the drone. Since each drone is built according to the pilot's customizations, only the pilot knows how to fix his drone and the items in each toolbox varies. However, the standard essentials tend to be props, batteries, electronic flight controllers, transmitters, spanners and screw drivers.
SPARES: A drone pilot fixing his drone, on top of his tool box. The toolbox is the “healing pack” for drone racers. It contains spare parts to every component of the drone. Since each drone is built according to the pilot’s customisations, only the pilot knows how to fix his drone and the items in each toolbox vary. However, the standard essentials tend to be props, batteries, electronic flight controllers, transmitters, spanners, and screwdrivers.

 

BUDDY SYSTEM: Drone pilots and "spotters", racing in a monthly drone race sponsored by Drone Matters, a local drone shop. Hobbyist pilots and pilots from other drone shops take part in these monthly friendly races. Each pilot is paired with a "spotter", who taps into the pilot's video feed, and watches it via their own FPV goggle. The role of the "spotter" is to monitor if the pilot has completed the obstacles in the course and to also ensure if the pilot flies safely.
BUDDY SYSTEM: Drone pilots and “spotters”, racing in a monthly drone race sponsored by Drone Matters, a local drone shop. Hobbyist pilots and pilots from other drone shops take part in these monthly friendly races. Each pilot is paired with a “spotter”, who taps into the pilot’s video feed, and watches it via their own FPV goggle. The role of the “spotter” is to monitor if the pilot has completed the obstacles in the course and to ensure that the pilot flies safely.

 

RACE TRACK: Cones and gates that are part of the drone racing course. The cones dictate the course route, while the gates and flags serve as obstacles for the pilots to maneuver through and perform turns such as the slalom, hairpin, sweeper and tight radius.
RACE TRACK: Cones and gates that are part of the drone racing course. The cones dictate the course route, while the gates and flags serve as obstacles for the pilots to manoeuvre through and perform turns such as the slalom, hairpin, sweeper and tight radius. The drones are also flown below the height of the trees, for safety purposes. The races are won based on timing and completing the obstacles in the circuit.

 

CLOSE CONTACT: Two drones flying through a gate. Flying from first-person view is a challenge of its own. The pilot has to be alert and skillful in avoiding obstacles and flying through space constraints, all while flying at an average speed between 50 to 70 km/h. It is common for them to experience crashes and let a lone close shaves, by shaving off grass blades or leave, while flying the course. The unlucky few crash into obstacles or even other drones and end up with severe damage to their drones.
CLOSE CONTACT: Two drones flying through a gate. Flying with FPV is a challenge of its own. The pilot has to be alert and skillful to avoid obstacles while flying through space constraints, at an average speed between 50 to 70 km/h. It is common for drones to crash or to have close-shaves with the track terrain like trees and tall grasses while flying the course. The unlucky few crash into obstacles or even other drones and end up with severe damage.

 

MY GOGGLE IS COOLER: A pilot wearing his first-person view (FPV) google. The pilots fly their drones using the live feed from the camera attached to their drones. Their goggles pick up the feed that is transmitted from their drones, via an antenna. Flying with the FPV goggle, creates an illusion of flying in the drone and this is one of the main attractive nature of FPV drone racing.
LIVE VIEW: Mr Zacky Abdul Razak, 36, wearing his FPV goggle. The pilots fly their drones using the live feed from the camera attached to their drones. Their goggles pick up the feed that is transmitted from their drones, via an antenna. Flying with the FPV goggle creates the perception of actual flying and this is one of the main attractions of FPV drone racing.

 

HOW DO YOU LIKE YOU LIVE VIEW: A "spotter" using a screen to tap into the live feed of a pilot. Instead of using FPV goggles, one can also use screen monitors to fly the drones or monitor other pilots' feeds.
SPOT ME: A “spotter” using a screen to tap into the live feed of a pilot. Instead of using FPV goggles, one can also use screen monitors to fly the drones or monitor other pilots’ feeds.

 

QUAD-WHAT: A quadcoptor with LED lights attached to it. Quadcopters are drones which have four propellers. The average quadcopter is made up of a frame which holds the electrical speed controller, battery, camera and transmitters. Each propeller is attached to a motor and connected to a circuit board, on the frame. The entire setup can be customised, to the preference of the pilot. Some might even include LED lights. However, the more power consuming items you have on a drone, the shorter your flight time. The average flight time tends to hover between two to three minutes.
FLYING MACHINES: A quadcopter with LED lights attached to it. Quadcopters are drones which have four propellers. The average quadcopter is made up of a frame which holds the electrical speed controller, battery, camera, and transmitters. Each propeller is attached to a motor and connected to a circuit board, on the frame. The entire setup can be customised, to the preference of the pilot. Some might even include LED lights. However, the more power-consuming items you have on a drone, the shorter your flight time. The average flight time tends to hover between two and three minutes.

 

DRONE RACING: A racing drone hovering beside Mr Lai Choon How, 45. Drone pilots control the drone based on the live feed from the drone camera's, instead of looking directly at the drone's location. This creates the perception of actual flying for the pilot. "First-person view makes you feel like you are really flying and that's exciting. it is also safe as the drone is the only one crashing," said: Mr How. The commercial photographer has spent about $7000 in total on racing drones and has participated in about 3 local competitions thus far.
IN THE PILOT SEAT: A racing drone hovering beside Mr Lai Choon How, 45. Drone pilots control the drone based on the live feed from the drone cameras, instead of looking directly at the drone’s location. This creates the perception of actual flying for the pilot. “The first-person view makes you feel like you are really flying and that’s exciting. It is also safe as the drone is the only one crashing,” said Mr Lai. The commercial photographer has spent about $7,000 in total on racing drones and has participated in about three local competitions thus far.

 

CARPARKS FLYING:Drones flying by in a multi story carpark. Pilots from Roy Ph (RPiSG), have weekly recreational flies, at a multi story carpark, at night. "I find flying in carparks more interesting as requires more skillful flying, with greater flight restrictions, such as the high and even sharper turns," said: Mr Yi Ming, 37, one of the pilots from RPiSG.
RECREATIONAL FLIGHT TIME: Drones flying by in a multistorey carpark. Drone pilots from RPiSG, meet weekly to fly their drones, at a multistorey carpark, at night. “I find flying in carparks more interesting as it requires more skillful flying, with greater flight restrictions, such as the height and even sharper turns,” said Mr Yi Ming, 37, a drone pilot from RPiSG.

 

COOL DADS: Pilots from RPiSG, flying their drones in a multistory carpark. (From left): Mr Dave Tang, 34, Mr Lai Choon How, 45, Mr Yi Ming, 37, and Mr Ryu Goh, 33 met via facebook as drone flying enthusiasts and have been flying on a weekly basis. "We are dads and have full time jobs. So can only fly at night after our children have gone to bed and this place gives us the opportunity to do so," said: Mr Tang. Mr Tang was inspired to pick up drone racing after watching youtube videos of drone racing in carparks, overseas. He posted his videos on facebook and was contacted by the others. So he gathered them and organised weekly drone flies.
PILOT DADS: Drone pilots from RPiSG, flying their drones in a multistorey carpark. (From left): Mr Ryu Goh, 34, Mr Lai, Mr Yi, and Mr Dave Tang, 33, met via Facebook as drone enthusiasts and have been flying on a weekly basis. “We are all dads and have full-time jobs. So can only fly at night after our children have gone to bed and this place gives us the opportunity to do so,” said Mr Tang. Mr Tang was inspired to pick up drone racing after watching Youtube videos of drone racing in carparks, overseas. He posted his videos on Facebook and was contacted by the others. So he gathered them and organised weekly drone meets.

 

Featured image and other images by Najeer Yusof.

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by Najeer Yusof

FOR the past four years Muslim foreign workers from the dormitories along Kian Teck Avenue have been gathering along the pavements to pray the Eid Adha prayers. Since the nearest mosque is quite a distance from their dormitories, they have decided to organise their own prayers, just outside their dormitories.

There are about 2,000 Muslim foreign workers and a total of three different groups organising the prayers. Each group prays at a different time slot to cater to the population. TMG observed the group that conducted their prayers along Kian Teck Cresent. They began laying the canvas and setting up the sound system at around 6.30am and the prayers commenced at 7.30am.

 

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SERMON: The sermon for Eid Adha prayers are read from this book. They are in Arabic and come with Bengali translations. Two sermons were read out for the Eid Adha prayers. These sermons are similar to those read in all the mosques in Bangladesh.

 

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SOUND SYSTEM: A speaker secured to the trunk of a tree using raffia string. The Imam, who leads the prayers, wears a microphone set around his neck, as he delivers the sermon and the prayer commands. There are two speakers placed along the street to magnify the Imam’s dictation for the huge turnout of foreign workers. About 1,000 Muslim workers joined the prayers today and that has been the average turnout.

 

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NEW CLOTHES: A fellow worker ties a turban around the cap of his friend before heading for prayers. The wearing of the turban around the cap was a practice of Prophet Muhammad. Turbans have been worn by the Arabs even before Islam was adopted and the turban is worn in a reversed manner, with excess cloth hanging at the back of the turban for shielding’s one’s face during sandstorms.

 

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THE IMAM: Mr Mohammad Botchan, 26, has led both the Eid Adha and Eid Fitr prayers for four years. He has memorised the entire Quran, as part of his Islamic Studies in Bangladesh. After his parents passed away, he had to support his siblings and decided to come to Singapore to work as the pay was better. Since Islamic Studies would not land him a job in Singapore, he acquired the skills of piping and welding in Bangladesh. He came to Singapore in 2009 and has been working for Alpha Engineering Private Limited, in Keppel Shipyard, for seven years. “Anyone can come and pray. The police watch us every day, as we conduct our daily prayers here too, but there is no problem. The Singapore Government also understands that we are only conducting prayers and not misleading anyone. We just want to encourage our fellow men to continue practising the teachings of Islam and not be misled,” said Mr Botchan. Mr Botchan was able to get his siblings married off after coming to work in Singapore and plans to get married in Bangladesh after his work permit expires in July.

 

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ASKING FOR FORGIVENESS: Muslim foreign workers crying as they ask for forgiveness. After the prayer, the Imam leads the rest with asking for forgiveness and seeking blessings. This portion is done with the cupping of both hands as a symbol, and one can ask God for anything he wishes.

 

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‘EID MUBARAK’: Muslim foreign workers from the first group embracing one another after the prayers and wishing each other a blessed Eid Adha, as the second group, also about 1,000 strong, prepares for their prayers. There were two groups led by different Imams and they led their prayers at different time slots, one at 7.30am and another at 8am. The different time slots were to cater for the huge population of Muslim foreign workers from all the dormitories along Kian Teck Avenue.

 

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MEALTIME: Muslim foreign workers from the first group enjoying a meal together after the prayers. One of the fellow workers prepared the meal in the morning before the prayers. The meal was served in huge round plates and the workers sat in groups of fives, around each plate.

 

All images by Najeer Yusof.

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Chiara Micheletti helps her mother Marisa Vesco take a shower in Cossato, Italy, June 7, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life she was not able to bathe herself. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMRJ

GAIA SQUARCI/ REUTERS

Marisa Vesco eats ice cream in her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 30, 2015. Marisa suffered from liver cancer and a loss of appetite during the last months of her life; eating ice cream was one of her few pleasures. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMRF
LIFE PLEASURES: Marisa Vesco eats ice cream in her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 30, 2015. Marisa suffered from liver cancer and a loss of appetite during the last months of her life; eating ice cream was one of her few pleasures. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

MY GRANDMOTHER’S life and mine overlapped for 27 years. I always called her “Nonna.”

Our age difference and profoundly contrasting values and way of thinking did not prevent us from developing a strong bond and a relationship punctuated by mischievous games and moments of tenderness and humour. We were amused by our differences.

“You know, I was still young when you were born,” she told me a few weeks before she died. “It’s a little like we grew up together.”

At a lunch table a few months earlier in Milan, I learned from my mother, her daughter, that Nonna, 85, suffered from incurable liver cancer. Years before, she had already survived two bouts of breast cancer.

 

Old family photographs are seen on Marisa VescoÕs bed as she works on creating a family album with her granddaughter, the photographer Gaia Squarci in Cossato, Italy, July 1, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMSH
PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY: Old family photographs are seen on Marisa Vesco’s bed as she works on creating a family album with her granddaughter, the photographer. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

Nonna would tell me time and time again that the news of my birth had given her the strength to fight.

When I learned that she was sick again, I had just landed in Italy, where I would be for only three days before flying back to New York.

Even more heartbreaking than the fear of saying goodbye to her was the fact that my grandmother did not know how sick she was. My mother and aunt believed she could not bear the thought of a third bout with cancer, this time, affecting her liver. Nonna was told by family members that her liver was ill.

 

Chiara Micheletti helps to bathe her mother Marisa Vesco in Milan, Italy May 21, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life needed assistance. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMS3
MOTHER AND DAUGHTER: Chiara Micheletti helps to bathe her mother Marisa Vesco in Milan, Italy May 21, 2015. Marisa suffered from incurable liver cancer and in the last months of her life needed assistance. Her daughter Chiara cherished the time she was able to help her mother. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

No one ever mentioned the word “cancer.”

Because of this, one question haunted us until the day she died: Did we have the right to know the truth about her condition when she did not?

Nonna spent most of her last months at home, surrounded by family. She reconciled with the idea of death and said she could slowly feel it coming.

Doctors felt that surgery and chemotherapy would be pointless.

 

Marisa VescoÕs perfume bottles, almost all of which were empty, sit on the edge of the bath at her home in Cossato, Italy, February 5, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMSD
A WHIFF OF THE PAST: Marisa Vesco’s perfume bottles, almost all of which were empty, sit on the edge of the bath at her home in Cossato, Italy, February 5, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

In the midst of all this, I realised my mother was losing her mother.

After moving back to Italy for a few months, I witnessed the range of my mother’s emotions and the energy she devoted to the time they had left together.

Nonna’s world shrank to a few walls and fewer streets. In this narrow existence, every detail and daily act took on deeper meaning.

 

The pills taken by Marisa Vesco to alleviate the symptoms of liver cancer are photographed on her bed in Cossato, Italy, June 23, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMSF
DAILY SUSTENANCE: The pills taken by Marisa Vesco to alleviate the symptoms of liver cancer. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

One of the things my mother treasured most was giving her mother a bath. She did not hesitate to touch her old body, and she did not want others to do it on her behalf.

I joined my mother and grandmother in the bathroom to quietly observe them with my camera.

 

Marisa Vesco reaches for a magazine in a bedroom of her apartment in Cossato, Italy, June 7, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMR1
REQUIRED READING: Marisa Vesco reaches for a magazine in a bedroom of her apartment. She joked about the photos taken by the photographer appearing on the magazine covers. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

As I experienced those precious moments, I imagined myself at an older age and thought about how time changes one’s perspective on being a woman.

As my grandmother faced my lens, completely naked, her body bearing the signs of past and present illnesses, she did not show the slightest bit of shame – only trust and pride.

 

Marisa Vesco embraces her nephew Luca Squarci during a visit to Cossato, Italy, June 22, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSMMSQ
HUGS: Marisa Vesco embraces her nephew Luca Squarci during a visit to Cossato, Italy. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

If you spoke with people in Nonna’s town they would say she never left the house without being enveloped in a cloud of perfume, her white hair perfectly coiffed and her face tinged with makeup.

I was surprised by the way she confronted being ill without losing her femininity. She was able to poke fun at herself. More than once she asked me, “Am I going to end up on Vogue or Marie Claire?”

 

Chiara Micheletti embraces her mother Marisa Vesco in her room at a hospice where she stayed for a month and a half before her death in Biella, Italy, August 21, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMR5
BY HER SIDE: Chiara Micheletti embraces her mother Marisa Vesco in her room at a hospice where she stayed for a month and a half before her death in Biella, Italy, August 21, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

On October 11, 2015, the day Nonna died in Biella, Italy, I was across the world in Brooklyn, New York. I had spent five months with her, celebrating her life instead of mourning her death.

I remember taking a walk through the Greenpoint neighbourhood of Brooklyn and staring for a while at kids competing in a race. I was unable to come to terms with the fact she was no longer a part of the world around me.

I struggled with the concept of death and the abstract emotion we call grief. I found peace only when I returned to Italy to spread Nonna’s ashes.

 

Marisa VescoÕs ashes are spread by her nephew Luca Squarci at her favourite location where she grew up near Cossato, Italy, December 16, 2015. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci SEARCH "ITALY CANCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. - RTSMMRC
FAREWELL: Marisa Vesco’s ashes are spread by her nephew Luca Squarci at her favourite location where she grew up near Cossato, Italy, December 16, 2015. (Photo by REUTERS/Gaia Squarci)

 

My family and I walked to Nonna’s favourite place in the mountains not far from Cossato in northwestern Italy, the town in which she had grown up.

Her ashes felt heavy in my hands. I threw them far up into the air, and they fell all over the grass, and all over me. My mother, brother and aunt did the same, again and again.

In the end, we were covered in Nonna’s ashes and so was the field around us.

Months later, my mother sent me a photograph of that field. It was completely covered in flowers.

 

Featured image by Gaia Squarci/ REUTERS.

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A tapestry depicting Mother Teresa of Calcutta is seen in the facade of Saint Peter's Basilica during a mass, celebrated by Pope Francis, for her canonisation in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini - RTX2O1TQ

REUTERS

POPE Francis proclaimed Mother Teresa of Calcutta a saint of the Roman Catholic Church on Sunday (September 4), 19 years after her death.

Thousands of pilgrims in St Peter’s Square applauded as the diminutive nun known as the “Saint of the Gutters” in her lifetime was officially elevated to join the Church’s more than 10,000 saints.

Francis’ predecessor Pope John Paul II bent Vatican rules to fast-track Mother Teresa to sainthood two years after she died in 1997.

The process usually does not start until at least five years after the candidate’s death.

Pilgrims streamed into St Peter’s Square at the Vatican from the early morning ahead of a service to honour the Nobel peace laureate, who worked among the world’s neediest in the slums of the Indian city now known as Kolkata.

Her legacy complements Pope Francis’ vision of a humble church that strives to serve the poor, and the festivities are a highlight of his Holy Year of Mercy, which runs until November 8.

 

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HALF-MAST: The state flag on top of the Parliament House, flying at half-mast. State flags on all government buildings were required to be flown at half-mast from Tuesday, Aug 23, till Friday, as a symbol of respect to the late Mr S. R. Nathan.

by Najeer Yusof

FORMER President Mr S. R. Nathan died on Monday, Aug 22, at the age of 92. His body was brought to his home along Ceylon Road on Tuesday and he lay in state at the Parliament House on Thursday. The state funeral procession took place on Friday, at 2pm. The ceremonial 25-pounder gun bearing his casket drove by landmarks of significance to him, such as the old City Hall and Fullerton Hotel before heading to National University of Singapore’s University Cultural Centre for the state funeral service. Here is a series of photos documenting the funeral from Tuesday:

 

HALF-MAST: The state flag on top of the Parliament House, flying at half-mast. State flags on all government buildings were required to be flown at half-mast from Tuesday, Aug 23, till Friday, as a symbol of respect to the late Mr S. R. Nathan.
HALF-MAST: The state flag on top of the Parliament House flying at half-mast. State flags on all government buildings were required to be flown at half-mast on Tuesday, Aug 23, till Friday, as a symbol of respect to the late Mr S. R. Nathan.

 

SLOW AND SOLEMN: The casket bearing the body of Mr S. R. Nathan arrived at his home along Ceylon Road from the Singapore General Hospital, on Tuesday morning, Aug 23, at around 10.45am. Eight pallbearers carrying the casket on their shoulders marched slowly into his house.
SLOW AND SOLEMN: The casket bearing the body of Mr S. R. Nathan arrived at his home along Ceylon Road from the Singapore General Hospital, on Tuesday morning, Aug 23, at around 10.45am. Eight pallbearers carrying the casket on their shoulders marched slowly into his house.

 

FINAL NOTES: A lady reading the messages of condolence left by others on the condolence boards at the Istana. 9 condolence boards were set up outside the Istana on Tuesday, Aug 23. Small white cards and pens were provided for the public to pen their messages for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. These cards were then slotted into the pockets of the condolence boards. The crowd was not as huge as compared to when the boards were set up previously for the passing on of Singapore's first Prime Minister, Mr Lee Kuan Yew.
FINAL NOTES: A lady reading the messages of condolence left by others on the condolence boards at the Istana. 9 condolence boards were set up outside the Istana on Tuesday, Aug 23. Small white cards and pens were provided for the public to pen their messages for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. These cards were then slotted into the pockets of the condolence boards. The crowd was not as huge as compared to when the boards were set up previously for the passing on of Singapore’s first Prime Minister, Mr Lee Kuan Yew.

 

E-TRIBUTE: Electronic display screen along Raffles Place MRT station featuring a tribute to Mr S. R. Nathan. Between intervals of advertisements, the screens of these electronic boards featured a picture of Mr Nathan and a message of tribute.
E-TRIBUTE: Electronic display screen along Raffles Place MRT station featuring a tribute to Mr S. R. Nathan. Between advertisements, the screens of these electronic boards featured a picture of Mr Nathan and a message.

 

PERSONAL TOUCH: Some members of the public brought flower bouquets and personalised boards with messages of gratitude for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. They were directed to place them on any one of the four tables beside the condolence boards along Saint Andrew's Road.
PERSONAL TOUCH: Some members of the public brought flower bouquets and personalised boards with messages of gratitude for the late Mr S. R. Nathan. They were directed to place them on any one of the four tables beside the condolence boards along Saint Andrew’s Road.

 

PAYING THEIR RESPECTS: The public heading to the Parliament House to pay their respects to the late Mr S. R. Nathan. Mr Nathan's body was brought to the Parliament House on Thursday, to lie in state. The public were allowed to pay their respects from 10am till 10pm. Throughout the day, people came to pay their respects and at 10pm, over 20,000 people has visited Mr Nathan.
PAYING THEIR RESPECTS: The public heading to the Parliament House to pay their respects to the late Mr S. R. Nathan. Mr Nathan’s body was brought to the Parliament House on Thursday, to lie in state. The public was allowed to pay their respects from 10am till 10pm. It was reported by the Straits Times that over 20,000 people had visited Mr Nathan on Thursday.

 

TENTAGES AND SIGNAGES: Temporary tentages and barricades were set up on the Padang, by the state funeral committee, to shade the public that were queuing up to pay their respects to Mr S. R. Nathan. The queues was only present during the day, as the crowd subsided by the evening. There were sign boards set up to signal the waiting time and they were placed along the queues during the day. However, these board were later removed, when the crowd subsided.
TENTAGES AND SIGNAGES: Temporary tentages and barricades were set up on the Padang, by the state funeral committee, to shade the public that was queuing up to pay their respects to Mr S. R. Nathan. The queues were only present during the day, as the crowd subsided by the evening. There were sign boards set up to signal the waiting time and they were placed within the queues during the day. However, these boards were later removed when the crowd subsided.

 

FREE WAFFLES: Ms Keish Lim, 23, stood alongside her mother Mdm Alice Lim, 54 (left), to gave out free waffles to the public leaving the Parliament House. Ms Keish Lim, who owns and runs, House of Waffros, a waffles stall at the coffeshop along Everton Park, brought along 55 pieces of waffles to the Parliament House yesterday. "My mother wanted to pay respects to Mr S. R. Nathan and told me make some waffles to give them out as a form of gratitude to the late Mr Nathan," said Ms Lim. She took about 5 hours in total to make the waffles and they came in five flavours: ham and cheese, azuki red bean, peanut, nutella and salted egg. After paying her respects with her mother, she started giving out the waffles around 8pm and by 8.30pm she was down to the last tray. She closed her stall two hours earlier, before heading to the Parliament House.
FREE WAFFLES: Ms Keish Lim, 23, stood alongside her mother Madam Alice Lim, 54, (left), and gave out free waffles to the public leaving the Parliament House on Thursday. Ms Lim, who owns and runs House of Waffros, a waffles stall at the coffee shop along Everton Park, brought along 55 pieces of waffle to the Parliament House yesterday. “My mother wanted to pay her respects to Mr S. R. Nathan and told me to make something to give out as a form of gratitude to the late Mr Nathan. So I decided to make waffles,” said Ms Lim. She took about five hours to make the waffles and they came in five different flavours: ham and cheese, azuki red bean, peanut, Nutella and salted egg. After paying her respects to Mr Nathan with her mother, she started giving out the waffles at around 8pm and by 8.30pm she was down to the last tray. She had closed her stall two hours earlier before heading to the Parliament House.

 

The ceremonial 25-pounder gun carriage carrying Mr S R Nathan's casket passed by the former City Hall today afternoon. After Lying-in-State at the Parliament House yesterday, Mr S R Nathan's casket was carried for a state funeral procession at 2pm. Beginning at the Parliament House, where he opened the Parliament on five occasions, as the President, his casket passed by other landmarks of significance to him such as the former City Hall. This was where the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) was located. Mr Nathan was a pioneer of the MFA in 1966 and spent a large portion of his career as part of the Foreign Service for Singapore. The funeral procession also passed by Fullerton Hotel and NTUC Centre. The procession ended at NUS's University Cultural Centre, for a State Funeral Service. Subsequently, his body was taken to the Mandai Crematorium for a private cremation.
FUNERAL PROCESSION: The ceremonial 25-pounder gun carriage carrying Mr S. R. Nathan’s casket, passing by Saint Andrew’s Road. After Lying-in-State at the Parliament House, Mr Nathan’s casket was carried for a state funeral procession at 2pm on Friday. Beginning at the Parliament House, where he opened Parliament on five occasions as President, his casket passed by other landmarks of significance to him such as the former City Hall, Fullerton Hotel and National Trades Union Congress Centre. The public gathered along the procession route, on sidewalks, to bid their final farewell. The procession ended at National University of Singapore’s University Cultural Centre, for a state funeral service.

 

All images by Najeer Yusof.

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Queen Elizabeth shares a toast with Singapore's President S.R. Nathan (R) during a state banquet at the Istana, the presidential palace in Singapore March 17, 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake/Pool - RTR17B0V
Former career civil servant S.R. Nathan (C) is sworn in as president of Singapore by Chief Justice Yong Pung How (R) September 1 as Prime Minister Goh Chock Tong looks on. Nathan, former head of the military intelligence service and ambassador to Washington, was uncontested in winning the largely ceremonial post August 18 after no other candidates were deemed suitably qualified. TAN - RTRQX52
FIRST TERM: Former career civil servant S. R. Nathan (C) is sworn in as president of Singapore by Chief Justice Yong Pung How (R) September 1 1999 as Prime Minister Goh Chock Tong looks on. Mr Nathan, former head of the military intelligence service and ambassador to Washington, was uncontested in winning the largely ceremonial post on August 18 after no other candidates were deemed suitably qualified.

 

President of Singapore S.R. Nathan, (C, rear) makes his speech before the Official Opening of the new Parliament House in Singapore October 4. The opening coincides with the Second Session of the Ninth Parliament of the Republic of Singapore. WS - RTRRB19
IN SESSION: President of Singapore S. R. Nathan (centre, rear) makes his speech before the Official Opening of the new Parliament House in Singapore October 4 1999. The opening coincides with the Second Session of the Ninth Parliament of the Republic of Singapore.

 

Singapore President S.R. Nathan (R), accompanied by his Chinese counterpart Jiang Zemin (L), reviews an honour guard during a welcoming ceremony in front of the Great Hall of the People in Beijing September 13, 2001. Nathan visited China for the first time since he took presidency. REUTERS/Guang Niu GN/RCS - RTRMOC3
FOREIGN TIES: Singapore President S. R. Nathan (right), accompanied by his Chinese counterpart Jiang Zemin (left), reviews an honour guard during a welcoming ceremony in front of the Great Hall of the People in Beijing September 13, 2001. Mr Nathan had visited China for the first time since he took presidency. (Photo by: REUTERS/Guang Niu)

 

Japan's Emperor Akihito (L) speaks with Singapore's President S.R. Nathan (R) through an interpreter during a state banquet at the Istana in Singapore June 9, 2006. The Japanese Royals are on a state visit to Singapore. REUTERS/Tim Chong (SINGAPORE) - RTR1E8O7
MEETING WITH ROYALS: Japan’s Emperor Akihito (left) speaks with Singapore’s President S. R. Nathan (right) through an interpreter during a state banquet at the Istana in Singapore June 9, 2006. The Japanese Royals were on a state visit to Singapore. (Photo by: REUTERS/Tim Chong)

 

Singapore's President S.R. Nathan (C) is greeted by supporters, after his re-election for a second term at the nomination centre in Singapore August 17, 2005. Singapore's President S.R. Nathan was formally re-elected on Wednesday after poll officials disqualified all other potential candidates. REUTERS/Luis Enrique Ascui LA/PN - RTRKR81
SECOND TERM: Singapore’s President S. R. Nathan (centre) is greeted by supporters, after his re-election for a second term at the nomination centre in Singapore August 17, 2005. Singapore’s President S.R. Nathan was formally re-elected on Wednesday after poll officials disqualified all other potential candidates. (Photo by: REUTERS/Luis Enrique Ascui)

 

Singapore President S.R. Nathan (C) inspects the guard of honour during Singapore's National Day parade at the Padang August 9, 2005. Singapore celebrated its 40th year of independence on Tuesday. REUTERS/Tim Chong TC/SA - RTRK0K6
NDP: Singapore President S. R. Nathan (centre) inspects the guard of honour during Singapore’s National Day parade at the Padang August 9, 2005. Singapore celebrated its 40th year of independence on Tuesday. (Photo by: REUTERS/Tim Chong)

 

Queen Elizabeth shares a toast with Singapore's President S.R. Nathan (R) during a state banquet at the Istana, the presidential palace in Singapore March 17, 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake/Pool - RTR17B0V
CHEERS: Queen Elizabeth shares a toast with Singapore’s President S. R. Nathan (right) during a state banquet at the Istana, the presidential palace in Singapore March 17, 2006. (Photo by: REUTERS/Jonathan Drake)

 

Singapore President S.R. Nathan and Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej leave after inspecting the guard of honour during a welcome ceremony at the Royal Military Airport in Bangkok. Singapore President S.R. Nathan (L) and Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej leave after inspecting the guard of honour during the president's welcome ceremony at the Royal Military Airport in Bangkok January 17, 2004. REUTERS/Stringer - RTRKRD3
MEET THE KING: Singapore President S. R. Nathan and Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej leave after inspecting the guard of honour during a welcome ceremony at the Royal Military Airport in Bangkok on January 17, 2004. (Photo by: REUTERS/Stringer)

 

Singapore's President S.R. Nathan holds the Youth Olympic torch during an event to celebrate the arrival of the Youth Olympic flame at the National University of Singapore August 6, 2010. The flame arrived in Singapore on Thursday, ahead of the inaugural Youth Olympic Games, which will be hosted in the city-state from August 14-26. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (SINGAPORE - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS) - RTR2H39N
LIGHTING THE WAY: Singapore’s President S. R. Nathan holds the Youth Olympic torch during an event to celebrate the arrival of the Youth Olympic flame at the National University of Singapore August 6, 2010. The flame arrived in Singapore on Thursday, ahead of the inaugural Youth Olympic Games, which will be hosted in the city-state from August 14-26. (Photo by: REUTERS/Vivek Prakash)

 

 

Featured image by REUTERS.

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by Najeer Yusof

THE victory parade for Joseph Schooling took place this morning, from about 9.50am and lasted up till 12.50pm. The three-hour long parade began at the Sports Hub, along Old Airport Road, and ended at Raffles City Shopping Mall. Schooling made a total of three pit stops. His first pit stop was at 50A Marine Terrace, followed by Singtel Comcentre Plaza and finally Raffles City, where he signed autographs with fans. He also stopped for a toilet break, along Republic Boulevard. TMG followed him throughout the parade and here is what the parade was like.

 

CROWD-SIZE: The first pit-stop Schooling made, was at his estate, Marine Parade. He was met with an overwhelming number of residents. They cheered as the parade bus drove to a stop and began crowding at the entrance of the bus, awaiting Schooling's appearance.
CROWD-SIZE: The first pit-stop Schooling made, was at his estate, Marine Parade. He was met with an overwhelming number of residents. They cheered as the parade bus drove to a stop and began crowding at the entrance of the bus, awaiting Schooling.

 

WEFIE TIME: After thanking the residents of his residential estate, Marine Parade, for turning up to show their support, Schooling then took a wefie with the crowd. The security officials had a tough time escorting him onto and off the stage as the crowd was mobbing him, as they tried to get pictures of Schooling.
WEFIE TIME: After thanking the residents of his residential estate, Marine Parade, for turning up to show their support, Schooling then took a ‘wefie’ with the crowd. The security officials had a tough time escorting him onto and off the stage as the crowd was mobbing him, as they tried to get pictures of Schooling.

 

SUPPORTERS HERE, THERE, EVERYWHERE: Students and teachers from the Canadian International School, lined up along the overhead bridge to wave at Schooling as the parade bus drove by. Supporters of Schooling were everywhere along the parade route. Some waved from buildings, overhead bridges and vehicles, while the majority stood along roadsides and cheered. The parade bus drove by four schools: Broadrick Secondary School, Tanjong Katong Girls' School, Tanjong Katong Primary School and Canadian International School. Students and teachers gathered along the roadside with handmade banners and Singapore flags and cheered for Schooling.
SUPPORTERS HERE, THERE, EVERYWHERE: Students and teachers from the Canadian International School, lined up along the overhead bridge to wave at Schooling as the parade bus drove by. Supporters of Schooling were everywhere along the parade route. Some waved from buildings, overhead bridges, and vehicles, while the majority stood along roadsides and cheered. The parade bus drove by four schools: Broadrick Secondary School, Tanjong Katong Girls’ School, Tanjong Katong Primary School and Canadian International School. Students and teachers gathered along the roadside with handmade banners and Singapore flags, as they cheered for Schooling.

 

WEARING RED: A family dressed in red, and carrying the Singapore flag, while waving at Schooling. Although the public were told to wear red, not many did so. The route map of the parade bus was shared online by the various news media, so that Singaporeans would know where to await catch the parade bus driving by. Along the parade route they many groups of people, waiting along the roadside, for Schooling to pass by.
WEARING RED: A family dressed in red, and carrying the Singapore flag, while waving at Schooling. Although the public were told to wear red, not many did so. The route map of the parade bus was shared online by the various news media so that Singaporeans would know where to catch the parade bus driving by. Along the parade route they many groups of people, waiting along the roadside, for Schooling to pass by.

 

DIE HARD FAN: When the Parade bus was moving along Bras Basah Road, this uncle rode by in his bicycle and waved the Singapore and Team Singapore flags at Schooling. He followed the parade bus for about 100 meters.
DIE HARD FAN: When the Parade bus was moving along Bras Basah Road, this uncle rode by on his bicycle and waved the Singapore and Team Singapore flags at Schooling. He followed the parade bus for about 100 metres.

 

SLOW DOWN, IT'S SCHOOLING: Even on the road, several Singaporeans waved and cheered at Schooling, as the parade bus drove by.This family of 6 wound open the car windows and sunroof to wave at Schooling. Other motorists honked at the parade bus to show their support for Schooling. Seeing the arrival of the parade bus, some even parked their vehicles by the side of the road to grab a quick picture of Schooling.
SLOW DOWN, IT’S SCHOOLING: Even on the road, several Singaporeans waved and cheered at Schooling, as the parade bus drove by. This family of six winded down the car windows and sunroof to wave at Schooling. Other motorists honked at the parade bus to show their support for Schooling. Seeing the arrival of the parade bus, some even parked their vehicles by the side of the road to grab a quick picture of Schooling.

 

LONE SUPPORTER: While most people got to the streets to try and get as close as possible to the parade bus, this aunty decided to wave at Schooling from her corridor.
LONE SUPPORTER: While most people got to the streets to try and get as close as possible to the parade bus, this aunty decided to wave at Schooling from the corridor of her flat.

 

HAPPY AUNTIES: (From left to right), Mdm Irin Au Yong, 55, Mdm Mary Qua, 55, and Mdm Jessie Yeo, 55, were celebrating after they successfully shot a video of Schooling amidst the overwhelming crowd at the Marine Terrace Market. They stood on the hawker centre tables, to get a vantage point as the crowd engulfed Schooling. Schooling was there to try the carrot cake from Bee Bee Carrot Cake stall.
HAPPY AUNTIES: (From left to right), Madam Irin Au Yong, 55, Madam Mary Qua, 55, and Madam Jessie Yeo, 55, were celebrating after they successfully shot a video of Schooling amidst the overwhelming crowd at the Marine Terrace Market. They stood on the hawker centre tables, to get a vantage point as the crowd engulfed Schooling. Schooling was there to try the carrot cake from Bee Bee Carrot Cake stall.

 

GOLDEN BOY: Joseph Schooling was spent most of the time on the top deck of the Duck & Hippo bus, waving at his supporters along the parade route. He did take occasional breaks by moving to the lower deck, when the parade bus was moving along the expressway. There were two Duck & Hippo busses that were a part of the parade entourage. Some of the media were on the same bus as him, while the rest were on the bus in front.
GOLDEN BOY: Joseph Schooling was spent most of the time on the top deck of the Duck & Hippo bus, waving at his supporters along the parade route. He did take occasional breaks by moving to the lower deck when the parade bus was moving along the expressway. There were two Duck & Hippo busses that were a part of the parade entourage. Some of the media were on the same bus as him, while the rest were on the bus in front.

 

 

Featured image and photos by Najeer Yusof.

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by Najeer Yusof

SINGAPORE’S Olympic gold medallist swimmer, Joseph Schooling, was received with a huge turnout when he landed at Changi Airport early on Monday morning. The 21-year-old’s Olympic gold medal performance in the 100m butterfly event saw him beat the 23-time Olympic gold medallist Michael Phelps and win the hearts of Singaporeans.

Although his plane was only scheduled to land at Changi Airport at around 5.35am, many supporters started showing up at Terminal 3 as early as 4am and gathered behind temporary metal barricades that stretched from Belt 42 to the arrival hall’s exit. Waving Singapore flags and Singapore scarves, the crowd became frantic as he stepped out of the arrival hall to greet them. The meet and greet session took place for at least an hour, as many supporters were trying their best to grab his autograph and take pictures with him. TMG staked out the gate from 3am and this is what we saw amid the frenzy:

 

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EARLY BIRD: Mr Sulaiman bin Ahmad Kemal, 42, a massage therapist, turned up at the airport with his daughter at 11.30pm the night before after taking the last train. He prepared his cheer props while his daughter was still sleeping. Mr Sulaiman has represented Singapore for the five-a-side soccer for the visually handicapped in the 2015 ASEAN Para Games.

 

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HOME SUPPORT: By 4.30am, the crowd of Singaporeans were already swelling. The flight information screens at the airport featured a picture of Schooling and added on a message of gratitude and appreciation, some Singaporeans decided to personally design their own banners, with handwritten messages.

 

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Mr Colin Schooling was the earliest to arrive and speak to the media. The 68-year-old was not able to join his son at Rio de Janeiro due to health reasons but watched his son compete on the television. Moved by his son’s achievement, he said: “Joseph’s motto is: dare to dream and I think he’s done a good job… Now we have to aim for the world record.” Not having seen his dad for the past few months, the younger Schooling embraced him the moment he saw him.

 

TURN OUT: Initially reporters filming the crowd had to rouse them by getting them to cheer and wave their Singapore flags. However, the moment Schooling stepped into the arrival hall the crowd turn into a frenzy without any prompting. Most of them brought the Singapore flags and wore the Singapore scarves.
TURN OUT: Initially reporters filming the crowd had to rouse them by getting them to cheer and wave their Singapore flags. However, the moment Schooling stepped into the arrival hall the crowd turn into a frenzy without any prompting. Most of them brought the Singapore flags and wore the Singapore scarves.

 

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CELEBRITY: Many were either trying to hug Schooling, get a selfie with him, or get his autograph as he interacted with his fans along the way to the arrival hall’s exit. Students from his former school, ACS, welcomed him by singing their school song and Schooling signed his autographs on their t-shirts.

 

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FAMILY SUPPORT: Schooling’s aunt and uncles turned up to welcome him too. He hugged his aunt, Mdm Cora Schooling, 61, and she proceeded to pose for photos with him after claiming to be a very proud aunt.

 

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MOVED A MOTION: Schooling was garlanded and he posed for a photo with the ministers: Mr Tan Chuan Jin, who flew back to Singapore with him and Mr Teo Chee Hean. Also present were Senior Minister of State for Culture, Community and Youth Sim Ann and Parliamentary Secretary for Community Culture and Youth Baey Yam Keng. Schooling was invited by the Prime Minister, Mr Lee Hsien Loong, to join the parliamentary session later in the afternoon, and was given a 30-second standing ovation by the House, as it moved a motion to congratulate him on his achievement.

 

Featured image by Najeer Yusof.

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